Garlic

Garlic extracts (Allium sativum) are obtained from the tuber, and processed into tablets, powder or oil; Main active ingredient of garlic is allicin or S-allylcysteine, an amino acid by-product. Garlic can also be eaten raw or cooked. Since the active ingredients are volatile and destroyed by shredding, the amount varies greatly of drug in the various forms of garlic. Supplements are best standardized by the amount of active ingredient. Mature garlic extract (AGE), made of garlic, which has matured at least 20 months, has more stable drugs than most forms. Consumption of garlic supplements in this form seems to have the greatest health benefits and no adverse effects.

(. See also nutritional supplements Overview) garlic extracts (Allium sativum) are obtained from the tuber and processed into tablets, powder or oil; Main active ingredient of garlic is allicin or S-allylcysteine, an amino acid by-product. Garlic can also be eaten raw or cooked. Since the active ingredients are volatile and destroyed by shredding, the amount varies greatly of drug in the various forms of garlic. Supplements are best standardized by the amount of active ingredient. Mature garlic extract (AGE), made of garlic, which has matured at least 20 months, has more stable drugs than most forms. Consumption of garlic supplements in this form seems to have the greatest health benefits and no adverse effects. Allegations garlic is said to have a beneficial effect on various cardiac risk factors; he is including blood pressure, serum lipid – can reduce and glucose levels; in vitro it inhibits platelet aggregation. is also suspected that garlic might protect against larynx, stomach, colorectal and endometrial cancer, and before a adenomatous polyposis coli. Documents The strongest evidence for garlic supplementation, especially AGE, the blood pressure reduction. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-response study of 79 general practice patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension the effect of AGE supplementation for 12 weeks was investigated. The study showed that a daily dose of 240, 480, and 960 mg AGE containing 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4 mg of S-allylcysteine, each significantly reduced the mean systolic blood pressure compared to placebo (1) , The results of the lipid-lowering effect of garlic supplementation were quite contradictory. A meta-analysis of 2012 from 26 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials showed that supplementation with garlic versus placebo in reducing serum total cholesterol (TC) – and triglyceride (TG) levels were superior. The authors suggested that garlic supplementation serum TC and TG levels can reduce, and that patients can benefit with risk of cardiovascular disease from the garlic therapy (2). Scientific evidence regarding garlic recording or garlic supplement show little or no protection against cancer or regulation of glucose. A prospective cohort study has ausgewertert the absorption of garlic in relation to the incidence of colorectal cancer and found no protective effect (3). Evaluation of garlic supplements and glucose regulation is limited to few if any human placebo-controlled studies. In large quantities consumed garlic have general antimicrobial effects in vitro (4). Most of these studies lack the specific details regarding the completion and / or concentration of the active ingredients in the supplement, which account for the variable results. Unpleasant side effects breath and body odor and nausea are possible; in high doses of garlic can “burn” in the mouth, esophagus and stomach. Interactions with drugs is contraindicated garlic principle for patients with bleeding tendency (diathesis) or with simultaneous administration of antiplatelet drugs, antihypertensives or warfarin. Garlic can reduce saquinavir in serum. Note to garlic Ried K, Frank OR, Stocks NP. Aged garlic extract Reduces blood pressure in hypertensives: a dose-response trial. EUR J Clin Nutr 67 (1): 64-70, 2013. Zeng T, Guo FF, Zhang CL, et al. A meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials for the effects of garlic on serum lipid profiles. J Sci Food Agric92 (9): 1892-1902, 2012. Meng S, Zhang X, Giovannucci EL, et al.No association between garlic intake and risk of colorectal cancer. Cancer Epidemiol 37 (2): 152-155, 2013. A Filocamo, Nueno-Palop C, Bisignano C, et al. Effect of garlic powder on the growth of commensal bacteria from the gastrointestinal tract. Phytomedicine. 19 (8-9): 707-711, 2012 Design.

Health Life Media Team

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