Fulminant Hepatitis

Under a fulminant hepatitis refers to the rare syndrome of massive Leberparenchymnekrose and a decrease in liver size (acute yellow atrophy), which usually occurs as a result of infection with certain hepatitis viruses or associated with toxic substances or a drug-induced damage.

(See also Diagnostic examination of patients with liver disease and acute viral hepatitis Overview}.)

Under a fulminant hepatitis refers to the rare syndrome of massive Leberparenchymnekrose and a decrease in liver size (acute yellow atrophy), which usually occurs as a result of infection with certain hepatitis viruses or associated with toxic substances or a drug-induced damage. (See also Diagnostic examination of patients with liver disease and acute viral hepatitis Overview}.) Sometimes the hepatitis B virus is responsible for fulminant hepatitis, and up to 50% of cases of fulminant hepatitis B is hepatitis D co-infection. Fulminant hepatitis with hepatitis A virus is rare, but is more common in individuals with pre-existing liver disease. The role of the Hepatitis C virus is not clear. The condition of patients is rapidly deteriorating because portosystemic encephalopathy developed to several weeks progresses over a period of several days to coma and brain edema. A bleeding disorder often arises as a result of liver failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. A functional renal failure (hepatorenal syndrome) may develop. A prolonged prothrombin time, portosystemic encephalopathy and especially kidney failure are bad signs. Diagnosis Clinical Investigation Determination of liver (Function) parameter PT / INR measurement fulminant hepatitis should be suspected if patients, rapid variations of their mental condition or unexplained bleedings are acutely ill with a neuausbrechenden jaundice, or if the condition of the patient with known liver disease rapidly deteriorated in any way. Among the laboratory tests that confirm a diagnosis of fulminant hepatitis, including liver function tests and PT / INR. Laboratory tests for acute hepatitis A, B and C viruses and certain other viruses (such as cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus) are performed to determine if a virus is the cause. Oral therapy eNukleosid- or nucleotide liver transplantation A particularly careful care and intensive treatment of complications improve the flow. When fulminant hepatitis episode of hepatitis B is a treatment with oral nucleoside or nucleotide analogs may improve the probability of survival. On the other hand, only liver transplantation the most promising treatment option. Adults survive such a course rarely without transplantation, children tend to have a more favorable course. Patients who survive acute liver failure, recover completely normally.

Health Life Media Team

Leave a Reply