Focal Segmental Sclerosing Glomerulonephritis

The focal segmental sclerosing glomerulonephritis is a scattered (segmental) mesangial sclerosis that begins in some, but not all (focal) glomeruli and eventually affects everyone Gloeruli. It occurs mostly idiopathic, but also the result of the use of heroin or other drugs, HIV infection, obesity, sickle cell anemia, a atheroembolic disease or Nephronverlust (z. B. with reflux nephropathy, partial nephrectomy or renal dysgenesis) can be. It manifests itself mainly in adolescents but also among young adults and middle-aged adults. In the patients, a gradual onset of proteinuria, hematuria weak, hypertension and azotemia shows. The diagnosis is confirmed by renal biopsy. The treatment is effected by means Angiotensinhemmung and idiopathic disease with corticosteroids and sometimes cytostatics.

The focal segmental sclerosing glomerulonephritis (FSSGN) is the most common cause of idiopathic (or primary) nephrotic syndrome in adults in the United States. It is especially common in dark-skinned men. Although it is idiopathic usually can FSGS in conjunction with other factors (secondary FSGS), including medications and drugs (eg. As heroin, lithium, interferon-alpha, pamidronate, cyclosporin or NSAID [causes Analgesic]), atheroembolic renal disease, obesity or HIV infection (HIV-associated nephropathy) occur and cause Nephronverlust (e.g., reflux nephropathy, subtotal nephrectomy, renal dysgenesis. [eg Oligomeganephronie. renal hypoplasia with a reduced number of nephrons]). There are familial clustering.

The focal segmental sclerosing glomerulonephritis is a scattered (segmental) mesangial sclerosis that begins in some, but not all (focal) glomeruli and eventually affects everyone Gloeruli. It occurs mostly idiopathic, but also the result of the use of heroin or other drugs, HIV infection, obesity, sickle cell anemia, a atheroembolic disease or Nephronverlust (z. B. with reflux nephropathy, partial nephrectomy or renal dysgenesis) can be. It manifests itself mainly in adolescents but also among young adults and middle-aged adults. In the patients, a gradual onset of proteinuria, hematuria weak, hypertension and azotemia shows. The diagnosis is confirmed by renal biopsy. The treatment is effected by means Angiotensinhemmung and idiopathic disease with corticosteroids and sometimes cytostatics. The focal segmental sclerosing glomerulonephritis (FSSGN) is the most common cause of idiopathic (or primary) nephrotic syndrome in adults in the United States. It is especially common in dark-skinned men. Although it is idiopathic usually can FSGS in conjunction with other factors (secondary FSGS), including medications and drugs (eg. As heroin, lithium, interferon-alpha, pamidronate, cyclosporin or NSAID [causes Analgesic]), atheroembolic renal disease, obesity or HIV infection (HIV-associated nephropathy) occur and cause Nephronverlust (e.g., reflux nephropathy, subtotal nephrectomy, renal dysgenesis. [eg Oligomeganephronie. renal hypoplasia with a reduced number of nephrons]). There are familial clustering. In a FSGS because both the size-and the charge-dependent ultrafiltration barriers are broken, the proteinuria is nonselective and usually relates to high molecular weight proteins (eg. As IGS) as well as albumin. Kidneys are usually small. Symptoms and complaints FSSGN patients usually present with severe proteinuria, hypertension, renal dysfunction, edema, or a combination. Sometimes the only sign is an asymptomatic proteinuria, which is not within the nephrotic range. Occasionally there is a microscopic hematuria. Diagnostic kidney biopsy, if possible, with immunostaining and electron FSGS is suspected in patients with nephrotic syndrome, proteinuria, or renal impairment without apparent cause, especially in patients who have disorders or taking drugs that are associated with FSGS. A Urinanuntersuchung is carried out and urea nitrogen levels, serum creatinine, and the 24-hour urine protein excretion was measured. The diagnosis is confirmed by renal biopsy, which shows a focal and segmental hyalinization of the glomeruli, often at immunostaining with an IgM and complement (C3) deposition of a nodular and coarse granular pattern. Electron microscopy can show diffuse cancellation of feet extensions in idiopathic cases, but incomplete cancellation at secondary cases. It may be seen a general sclerosis, along with secondary atrophic glomeruli. The biopsy may be false-negative when areas are not scanned by focal changes. Focal segmental glomerular sclerosis figures provided by Agnes Fogo, M.D., and the American Journal of Kidney Disease Atlas of Renal Pathology (see www.ajkd.org). var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/focal_segmental_glomerulosclerosis_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/focal_segmental_glomerulosclerosis_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ focal segmental glomerular sclerosis ‘, description:’ u003Ca id = “v38396917 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDas above image shows the right side of the glomerulus. The glomerulus

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