Flatter Chest

A flutter chest are a plurality of adjacent rib fractures resulting isolated in a segment of the chest wall from the rest of the thorax; it is a marker of damage to the underlying lung.

A single fin may break at more than one place. If a plurality of adjacent ribs at break ? 2 and which fractures arising in each rib a segment of the chest wall that is not mechanically connected to the rest of the thorax (Schlegel segment) is connected. This paradox Schlegel segment moves (i. E. Outwardly during exhalation and inwardly during Einatmung- Flatter chest.).

A flutter chest are a plurality of adjacent rib fractures resulting isolated in a segment of the chest wall from the rest of the thorax; it is a marker of damage to the underlying lung. A single fin may break at more than one place. If a plurality of adjacent ribs at break ? 2 and which fractures arising in each rib a segment of the chest wall that is not mechanically connected to the rest of the thorax (Schlegel segment) is connected. This paradox Schlegel segment moves (i. E. Outwardly during exhalation and inwardly during Einatmung- Flatter chest.). The patients have a high risk for respiratory complications, v. a. because the large amount of force that causes a flutter chest, typically causes a significant underlying lung contusion. In addition, the paradoxical movement of the chest flutter increases the work of breathing and pain in the chest wall tend to limit a deep inspiration and maximum ventilation. Flatter chest. Diagnosis Clinical examination Diagnosis is clinical, ideally by observing the paradoxical movement of the fluttering segment during breathing. However, this movement may be may be difficult to detect when the inspiration depth is limited by pain or impaired consciousness due to other injuries. The paradoxical movement does not occur when the patient is artificially ventilated, but the fluttering segment can be identified by its extreme outward movement during lung inflation. Palpation can often detect crepitus of fluttering segment and confirm an abnormal movement of the chest wall. Chest X-rays can help confirm fractures and is usually an underlying lung contusion; X-rays show no cartilage disorders. Therapy Supportive care Sometimes mechanical ventilation Humidified O2 is given. Painkillers can help to improve breathing by reducing the painful breathing, but breathing may need to be mechanically supported. The volume status should be monitored closely, because damage due to hypovolemia (due to hypoperfusion of the lungs) or fluid overload can occur (due to pulmonary edema), either.

Health Life Media Team

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