Feverfew

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) is a perennial bushy herb. The dried leaves are used in capsules, tablets and liquid extracts. It is thought that drugs such as parthenolide and glycosides for complaining anti-inflammatory and relaxing effects are responsible for the visceral muscles.

(See also nutritional supplements Overview.) Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) is a perennial bushy herb. The dried leaves are used in capsules, tablets and liquid extracts. It is thought that drugs such as parthenolide and glycosides for complaining anti-inflammatory and relaxing effects are responsible for the visceral muscles. Allegations feverfew should be able to prevent migraine headaches effectively and be helpful for menstrual pain, asthma and arthritis. In vitro feverfew inhibits platelet aggregation (1). Documents Three out of five relatively small but well-designed studies on the effect of feverfew in migraine do not support its effectiveness in the prevention (2-4), but two larger and better-designed studies (5-6). The differences between the study results may possibly be due to the diversity of feverfew preparations used and the dosage. There are few reports on the effects of feverfew on rheumatoid arthritis. One study showed no obvious benefit of oral feverfew in rheumatoid arthritis (7). Side effects mouth ulcers, contact dermatitis, taste disturbance (dysgeusia) and light gastrointestinal events are possible. Abrupt withdrawal may cause a worsening of migraine and cause nervousness and sleep disorders. Feverfew is contraindicated in pregnant women because it can cause uterine contractions. Drug interactions In principle Feverfew is contraindicated in all patients who are taking other migraine drugs, iron supplements, NSAIDs, platelet inhibitors, or warfarin. Note to feverfew Groenewegen WA, Heptinstall S. A comparison of the effects of an extract of feverfew and parthenolide, a component of feverfew, on human platelet activity in vitro. J Pharm Pharmacol 42: 553-557, 1990. Johnson ES, Kadam NP, Hylands DM, et al. Efficacy of feverfew as prophylactic treatment of migraine. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 291: 569-573, 1985. Murphy JJ, Heptinstall S, Mitchell JR. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of feverfew in migraine prevention. Lancet 2: 189-192, 1988. Palevitch D, G Earon, Carasso R. Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) as a prophylactic treatment for migraine-a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Phytotherapy Res 11: 508-511, 1997. Pfaffrath V, Diener HC, Fischer M, et al. The efficacy and safety of Tanacetum parthenium (feverfew) in migraine prophylaxis-a double-blind, multicentre, randomized placebo-controlled dose-response study. Cephalalgia22: 523-532, 2002. de Weerdt GJ, Bootsman HPR, Hendriks H.de Herbal medicines in migraine prevention. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study with a feverfew preparation. Phytomedicine 3: 225-230, 1996. Pattrick M, Heptinstall S, Doherty M. Feverfew in rheumatoid arthritis: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Ann Rheum Dis 48: 547-549., 1989

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