Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Alcohol in utero exposure increases the risk of miscarriage, decreased birth weight and fetal alcohol syndrome can cause a constellation of variable physical and cognitive abnormalities.

After birth, the children fall with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) by their growth retardation and a typical constellation of facial malformations such as microcephaly, microphthalmia, short eyelids, epicanthus, a small or flat midface (midface), a flat elongated philtrum, thin upper lip and a small chin. Abnormal hand lines, heart disease and joint contractures may also be present.

Alcohol in utero exposure increases the risk of miscarriage, decreased birth weight and fetal alcohol syndrome can cause a constellation of variable physical and cognitive abnormalities. After birth, the children fall with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) by their growth retardation and a typical constellation of facial malformations such as microcephaly, microphthalmia, short eyelids, epicanthus, a small or flat midface (midface), a flat elongated philtrum, thin upper lip and a small chin. Abnormal hand lines, heart disease and joint contractures may also be present. After the birth of cognitive deficits are identified. A FAS is possibly the most common cause of non-hereditary mental disability. The most serious consequence is a significant mental disability that is attributed to the teratogenic effects of alcohol, since a large number of children of alcoholic women is mentally handicapped. Diagnosis Clinical Investigation The diagnosis of FAS can be found in children who have typical findings and their mothers drank excessively during pregnancy. Individual physical or cognitive findings are not pathognomonic; a less severe alcohol abuse leads to a lower expression of FAS in the child so that the diagnosis can be difficult, since even partial expressions may occur. It is often difficult, the effects of alcohol on the developing fetus from the effects of other substances (eg. As tobacco, other drugs) and other factors (eg. As malnutrition, poor medical care, violence), women with excessive learn alcohol abuse, to distinguish. Therapy Supportive treatment FAS can not be treated. Substitution treatment should include an appropriate stimulating and nurturing environment. Good nutrition and growth are particularly important. Many children with FAS will require learning support at school. Since it is not known at what time during a pregnancy occurs, the Fetus and if there is such a thing as a safe limit for the amount of alcohol, pregnant women should be counseled to take no alcohol. Siblings of children with FAS should be examined on a mild manifestation of the disease.

Health Life Media Team

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