Erythema Multiforme

Erythema multiforme (EM) is an inflammatory reaction with shooting target lesions or rosettes. The oral mucosa may be affected. The diagnosis is made clinically. The lesions regress spontaneously, but recur frequently. The erythema multiforme usually occurs in response to an infectious germ as the herpes simplex virus (HSV) or mycoplasma, but may also be a substance reaction. In patients with frequent recurrences or symptomatic by the herpes simplex virus suppressive antiviral therapy may be required.

For years, was EM as a manifestation of the light spectrum of hypersensitivity reactions to drugs and thus ((SJS) and toxic epidermal Stevens-Johnson syndrome necrolysis (TEN)) belonged to the same group of diseases such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Meanwhile, however, there is evidence that EM is different from these other diseases.

Erythema multiforme (EM) is an inflammatory reaction with shooting target lesions or rosettes. The oral mucosa may be affected. The diagnosis is made clinically. The lesions regress spontaneously, but recur frequently. The erythema multiforme usually occurs in response to an infectious germ as the herpes simplex virus (HSV) or mycoplasma, but may also be a substance reaction. In patients with frequent recurrences or symptomatic by the herpes simplex virus suppressive antiviral therapy may be required. For years, was EM as a manifestation of the light spectrum of hypersensitivity reactions to drugs and thus ((SJS) and toxic epidermal Stevens-Johnson syndrome necrolysis (TEN)) belonged to the same group of diseases such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Meanwhile, however, there is evidence that EM is different from these other diseases. Etiology Most cases are on herpes simplex virus infections (HSV) due (HSV-1 more frequently than HSV-2), wherein it is unknown whether it is a specific or non-specific response to the virus in the EM lesions. Currently, it is believed that EM is formed by a T-cell-mediated cytolytic response to the HSV DNA fragments in the keratinocytes. A genetic predisposition it is assumed that EM is such a rare clinical manifestation of HSV infection, and several HLA subtypes have been associated with the predisposition to develop lesions in connection. Less common causes include drugs, vaccines, other viral diseases (especially hepatitis C) and any SLE. EM, which occurs in patients with SLE is sometimes referred to as Rowell’s syndrome. Symptoms and complaints EM occurs suddenly with asymptomatic, erythematous macules, papules, hives, blisters, bullae, or combinations thereof to the distal extremities (often incl. Palms and soles) and in the face. The lesions are typically annular with violet center and a livid Halo, which are separated from each other by a pale ring (target lesions or Kokarden). The lesions are symmetrically arranged and centripetal, often spreading to the fuselage. Some patients experience itching. The mouth target lesions occur on the lips and blisters and erosions on the palate and gums. Skin lesion (target) figure provided by Thomas Habif, M.D. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/skin_lesion_target_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/skin_lesion_target_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ skin lesion (target) ‘, description:’ u003Ca id = “v37894806 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eSchießscheibenläsionen (sometimes also referred to as rosettes) are manifested as an annular lesions with a violet center and a livid Halo

Health Life Media Team

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