Episcleritis

The episcleritis is a self-limiting, recurrent, idiopathic inflammation of the episcleral tissue that is not compromised vision. Symptoms include localized hyperemia in the bulb region, irritation and epiphora. The diagnosis is made clinically. The treatment is symptomatic.

Occurring in young adults episcleritis was seen more frequently in women. It is usually idiopathic, but can also be with collagen and rarely associated with severe systemic disease.

The episcleritis is a self-limiting, recurrent, idiopathic inflammation of the episcleral tissue that is not compromised vision. Symptoms include localized hyperemia in the bulb region, irritation and epiphora. The diagnosis is made clinically. The treatment is symptomatic. Occurring in young adults episcleritis was seen more frequently in women. It is usually idiopathic, but can also be with collagen and rarely associated with severe systemic disease. The eye is a little irritated. Directly under the bulbar conjunctiva also a bright red spot is present (simple episcleritis). A hyperemic, edematous, raised nodule (nodular episcleritis) may also be present. The conjunctiva is normal. Episcleritis Image courtesy of the Department of Ophthalmology of the University Hospital Erlangen-Nuremberg via the Online Journal of Ophthalmology (www.onjoph.com). var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/episcleritis_orig_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/episcleritis_orig_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ episcleritis ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37894211 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eEpiskleritis resembles the appearance of a conjunctivitis but epiphora occurs much less frequently

Health Life Media Team

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