Epiphysiolysis Femoris (Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis, Scfe)

The Epiphysiolysis femoris (SCFE) is a movement of the femoral head in the direction of the femoral epiphysis.

The disease typically occurs in early adolescence and especially in boys. Obesity is a major risk factor. Genetic factors are important. SCFE is bilaterally at a fifth of cases, unilateral SCFE is bilaterally at two-thirds of patients. The exact cause is unknown, but is related to the weakening of the growth due to trauma, hormonal changes, inflammation or increased shear forces because of obesity together.

The Epiphysiolysis femoris (SCFE) is a movement of the femoral head in the direction of the femoral epiphysis. The disease typically occurs in early adolescence and especially in boys. Obesity is a major risk factor. Genetic factors are important. SCFE is bilaterally at a fifth of cases, unilateral SCFE is bilaterally at two-thirds of patients. The exact cause is unknown, but is related to the weakening of the growth due to trauma, hormonal changes, inflammation or increased shear forces because of obesity together. Symptoms and signs The onset is usually insidious, and symptoms depend on the degree of displacement. The first symptom may be a Hüftsteifheit that is better at rest. This is followed by a limp and hip pain that radiates from the anteromedial thigh to the knee. Up to 15% of patients present with knee or thigh problem before, and the real problem is not discovered until the slipping strengthened. In a study of the hip in the early stages no pain or restriction of movement are sometimes present. Later, pain found in the affected hip, a limitation of hip flexion, hip abduction and medial rotation, knee pain without pathology and limp or Trendeleburg course. The affected leg is rotated outwardly. The blood supply is reduced in this area; avascular necrosis and collapse of the epiphysis may result. Diagnostic X-rays Sometimes magnetic resonance imaging, or sonography Since the treatment of advanced epiphyseolysis is extremely difficult, early diagnosis is important. It should anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of both hip joints are made, the x-ray images of the affected joints show an extension of the epiphyseal plate or a displacement of the humeral head posteriorly and inferiorly. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are also useful, especially if the radiographs are normal. Epiphysiolysis femoris (Slipped Capital Femoral epiphysis) with permission of the publisher. From Campbell R. Jr .: Current Orthopedic Diagnosis and Treatment. Edited by J.D. Heckman, R. C. Schenck and A. Agarwal. Philadelphia, Current Medicine, 2002. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/slipped_capital_femoral_epiphysis_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/ – / media / manual / professional / images / slipped_capital_femoral_epiphysis_high_de.jpg lang = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’? epiphysiolysis femoris (Slipped Capital femoral epiphysis) ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37897489 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eKlein lines are located along the upper border of the femoral neck in this patient with epiphysiolysis femoris of the right hip. The femoral head is at the affected right side below the small-line

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