Electrocardiography (Ecg) In Lung Diseases

Electrocardiography is a useful addition to other pulmonary tests because it provides information on the right side of the heart and thus on lung diseases such as chronic pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary embolism.

(See also electrocardiography in cardiovascular disease.) Electrocardiography is a useful addition to other pulmonary tests because it provides information on the right side of the heart and thus on lung diseases such as chronic pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary embolism. Chronic pulmonary hypertension, which leads to a dilation and hypertrophy of the right atrium and ventricle, may be in the ECG as a prominent P-wave (P pulmonale) and ST-segment depressions in leads II, III, and aVF, as a rightward shift of the cardiac electrical axis , express lower displacement of the P-wave vector and delayed R-progression in the chest leads. In COPD patients often have a low electrical voltage, which is caused by lung overdistended shares between the heart and ECG electrodes shows. A pulmonary embolism (submassiv or solid) can acute right heart pressures or insufficiency cause, which is conventionally (but not common) as a deviation of the axis of the heart (R> S in V1) to the right, as an enlarged S wave in lead I, increase in the Q wave in lead III and ST-segment elevation and inversion of the T wave in lead III and the chest leads (S1Q3T3 type). Occasionally, a right bundle branch block was observed.

Health Life Media Team

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