Ehrlichiosis And Anaplasmosis

Ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis caused by rickettsienähnliche bacteria. Ehrlichiosis is mainly caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis; Anaplasmosis caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Both are transmitted by ticks to humans. The symptoms are reminiscent of the symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, except that a rash is less common. The outbreak of the disease is sudden, with fever, chills, headache and malaise.

Ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis are associated with rickettsial infections.

Ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis caused by rickettsienähnliche bacteria. Ehrlichiosis is mainly caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis; Anaplasmosis caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Both are transmitted by ticks to humans. The symptoms are reminiscent of the symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, except that a rash is less common. The outbreak of the disease is sudden, with fever, chills, headache and malaise. Ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis are associated with rickettsial infections. E. chaffeensis causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Most cases of monocytic ehrlichiosis were recorded in the southeast and south of the US, where its arthropod (the ixodidae) is endemic. Anaplasma phagocytophilum (formerly E. phagocytophila) gives human granulocytic anaplasmosis, which is found in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, upper Midwest and on the West Coast of the United States, where his arthropod (ticks) is endemic. Lyme disease and babesiosis have the same tick vector and the same endemic area, and occasionally acquire patient co-infection after being bitten by an infected with more than one organism tick. Several cases of anaplasmosis have occurred after blood transfusions from asymptomatic or acutely infected donors. The differences in the primary target cells (monocytes and granulocytes in ehrlichiosis in anaplasmosis) only lead to small differences in the clinical manifestations. Ixodes scapularis Image courtesy of James Gathany on Public Health Image Library of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/ixodes_scapularis_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/ixodes_scapularis_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Ixodes scapularis’ description: ” credits’ Image courtesy of James Gathany on Public Health Image Library of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ‘hideCredits: false, hideTitle: false , hideFigure: false, hideDescription: true}; var panel = $ (MManual.utils.getCurrentScript ()) Closest ( ‘image-element-panel.’). ko.applyBindings (model, panel.get (0)); Symptoms and signs The clinical symptoms of ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis are similar. Although some infections are asymptomatic, most occur suddenly with an influenza-like illness and non-specific symptoms such as fever, chills, muscle pain, weakness, nausea, vomiting, cough. Headache and malaise, usually begin about 12 days after the tick bite. A rash is unusual for anaplasmosis. Some patients who are infected with E. chaffeensis, develop a maculopapular or petechial rash on the trunk and extremities. Ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis can lead to disseminated intravascular coagulation, multi-organ failure, seizures and coma. Both infections seem harder to run and to have a higher Sterblichketsrate, in patients with impaired immune defense – as they pass immunosuppressants (. Eg corticosteroids, cancer chemotherapy, long-term treatment with immunosuppressive drugs after organ transplants) was created – with HIV infection or splenectomy , Diagnostic PCR analysis of a blood sample serological diagnostic tests are available, but PCR from blood is sensitive and specific and can facilitate early diagnosis because seroligische investigation ends require comparing several titer. Cytoplasmic Ehrlichia inclusions in monocytes or neutrophils can be detected. Blood and liver function tests detect haematological and hepatic abnormalities such as leukopenia, thrombocytopenia and elevated aminotransferase levels. The therapy doxycycline therapy should be initiated if possible before the arrival of the lab results. In early initiation of treatment, patients generally speaking rapidly and well. A delayed start of treatment can lead to serious complications, u. a. viral and fungal superinfection and death in 2-5%. The primary therapy is carried out with doxycycline 200 mg p.o. 1 times a day, followed 2 times daily of 100 mg until clinical improvement occurs and the patient is 24-48 h afebrile. This therapy is retained over a further 7 days. Chloramphenicol is no longer effective. Some patients suffer despite adequate treatment continues for weeks from headaches, weakness and malaise. Prevention measures against tick bites are useful (tick bite prevention). Tick ??bite prevention To prevent ticks on skin, it should be on roads and paths remain pants in boots or socks stuck Long sleeved shirts bear repellents with diethyl toluamide (DEET) applied to the skin surface DEET should be used cautiously in very young children because of toxic reactions have been reported. Permethrin kills ticks on the clothes effectively. Frequent screening for ticks, particularly in hairy areas and among children, are essential in endemic areas. Full Suckled ticks should be removed with caution and not be crushed between your fingers, because the crushing the tick can lead to the transmission of diseases. The tick’s body should not be gripped or squeezed. By slowly pulling on the head with a small pair of tweezers, the tick can be removed. The insertion site should be wiped with alcohol. Vaseline, inflamed matches and other irritants are not effective ways to remove ticks and should not be used. There are no practical means available to free all areas of ticks, but the ticks populations in endemic areas can be reduced by controlling small animal populations. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/inf_tick_bite_de.gif?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ || ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/inf_tick_bite_de.gif?la=de&thn=0’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/inf_tick_bite_de.gif?la=de&thn=0’, title: ” description: ” credits ”, hideCredits: true hideTitle: true hideDescription: true}; var panel = $ (MManual.utils.getCurrentScript ()) Closest ( ‘image-element-panel.’). ko.applyBindings (model, panel.get (0));

Health Life Media Team

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