Effects Of Liver Disease On The Drug Metabolism

The clinical effects may v. a. vary in chronic liver diseases regardless of the bioavailability of the drugs, for. B. increased cerebral sensitivity to opiates and sedatives in patients with common chronic liver diseases. Therefore, low doses of these drugs appears to cause encephalopathy, when administered cirrhotic patients. The underlying mechanism for this effect is likely due to changes in the cerebral receptors for the appropriate medication.

A liver disease can have many effects on drug clearance, biotransformation and pharmacokinetics. Pathogenetic factors are changes in the intestinal absorption, plasma protein binding, the hepatic extraction ratio, the blood flow in the liver, portosystemic shunts, the biliary excretion, the enterohepatic circulation and renal clearance. Sometimes changes increase the content of bioavailable drugs such that normal doses can be toxic. However, content and unpredictable consequences on an individual drug and do not correlate with the type and severity of liver damage or with the results of liver function tests. Therefore, there are no general rules to modify the dose of medication in patients with liver diseases. The clinical effects may v. a. vary in chronic liver diseases regardless of the bioavailability of the drugs, for. B. increased cerebral sensitivity to opiates and sedatives in patients with common chronic liver diseases. Therefore, low doses of these drugs appears to cause encephalopathy, when administered cirrhotic patients. The underlying mechanism for this effect is likely due to changes in the cerebral receptors for the appropriate medication. Patients with advanced liver disease tend to have no more frequent adverse drug reactions, but these patients tolerate hepatic side effects of drugs less well.

Health Life Media Team

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