Eba

Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a rare acquired, chronic disease that is characterized by subepidermal blistering.

The EBA may occur at all ages. Type VII collagen, the main component of the anchoring fibrils, is the target antigen of this autoimmune disease. Multiple myeloma, amyloidosis, lymphoma, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease and systemic lupus erythematosus increase of developing EBA the risk.

Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a rare acquired, chronic disease that is characterized by subepidermal blistering. The EBA may occur at all ages. Type VII collagen, the main component of the anchoring fibrils, is the target antigen of this autoimmune disease. Multiple myeloma, amyloidosis, lymphoma, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease and systemic lupus erythematosus increase of developing EBA the risk. Symptoms and signs Initial symptoms are highly variable. Sometimes they are similar to those of bullous pemphigoid. Bullous lesions are usually in areas that are exposed to small traumas, like the extensorischen aspects of the elbows and dorsal aspects of the hands and feet. The healing scars caused usually milia (superficial, epidermal cysts) and hyperpigmentation. Some patients have dystrophic nails, a mucosal involvement or ocular lesions that lead to blindness. EBA DR Harout TANIELIAN / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/c0024009-epidermolysis-bullosa-skin-disease-science-photo-library-high_de.jpg?la= de & thn = 0 & mw = 350 ‘, imageUrl:’ /-/media/manual/professional/images/c0024009-epidermolysis-bullosa-skin-disease-science-photo-library-high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0 ‘, title: ‘EBA’ description: ‘ u003Ca id = “v37894570 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDiese illustration shows the hands of a 5-year-old child with scars

Health Life Media Team

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