Dose-Response Relationships

Dose-response data are typically associated with the dose or a function of dose (eg. As log 10 of the dose) on the x-axis and the measured effect of (reaction) plotted on the y-axis. Since the drug action is a function of dose and time, such a graph describes the dose-response relationship regardless of the time. The measured effects are often called maxima are recorded at the time of the greatest effect or under equilibrium conditions (eg., During a continuous infusion). Drug effects can be quantified at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, or organism Organsystem- level.

Regardless of how a drug effect occurs – by bonding or chemical interaction – the concentration of the drug at the site of action, the effect controls. However, the ratio of response to concentration can be complex and is often not linear. The relationship between drug dose, regardless of the dosage form, and the drug concentration at the cellular level is much more complex (s. Pharmacokinetics). Dose-response data are typically associated with the dose or a function of dose (eg. As log 10 of the dose) on the x-axis and the measured effect of (reaction) plotted on the y-axis. Since the drug action is a function of dose and time, such a graph describes the dose-response relationship regardless of the time. The measured effects are often called maxima are recorded at the time of the greatest effect or under equilibrium conditions (eg., During a continuous infusion). Drug effects can be quantified at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, or organism Organsystem- level. A hypothetical dose-response relationship has varying pattern (Hypothetical dose-response relationship.) Efficacy (position of the curve along the dose-axis) The maximum efficacy or ceiling effect (maximum achievable response) decrease (change in response per unit dose) In addition, occurs on a biological variation (variation in the extent of reaction among the test persons of the same population who receive the same drug). The graphical representation of the dose-response curves of drugs which were tested under identical conditions can, when comparing the pharmacological profile of drugs useful (comparison of the dose-response curves.). This information is useful in determining the dose required to achieve a desired reaction. The dose-response relationship, including the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, determines the required dose and frequency of administration as well as the therapeutic index of a drug in a population. The therapeutic index (ratio of the minimum toxic concentration for the median effective concentration) helps to determine efficacy and safety of a drug. An increase in the dose of drug with a narrow therapeutic index increases the likelihood of toxicity or inefficacy of the drug. However, this trumps can differ depending on population and are influenced by patient-related factors such. N. pregnancy, age and organ function (eg. As appriciated GFR). Hypothetical dose-response relationship. Comparison of the dose-response curves. Drug X has a greater biological activity per dose equivalent and therefore more potency than drug Y, or Z. drug X and Z have the same activity, as evidenced by their maximum attainable reaction (ceiling effect) is expressed. Y drug but has a higher potency as a drug Z, its maximum effectiveness is lower.

Health Life Media Team

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