Distal Humerus

(Supracondylar fractures)

Distal humerus fractures resulting in a rule of a case to an outstretched arm or direct application of force; they can be associated with neurovascular injury.

Distal humerus fractures are common in children aged 3 to 11 years. The usual mechanism of injury is a fall on an outstretched arm to the extended elbows or direct force and often causing a posterior displacement or angulation.

Distal humerus fractures resulting in a rule of a case to an outstretched arm or direct application of force; they can be associated with neurovascular injury. Distal humerus fractures are common in children aged 3 to 11 years. The usual mechanism of injury is a fall on an outstretched arm to the extended elbows or direct force and often causing a posterior displacement or angulation. The brachial artery or median nerve or radial nerve can be damaged, especially if the fracture is displaced or angled backwards. Neurovascular injuries sometimes lead to compartment syndrome of the forearm, which can cause an ischemic Volkmann’s contracture (flexion contracture at the wrist, which results in a claw-like deformity of the hand). Fractures are mostly intra-articular and cause hemarthrosis. Diagnosis anteroposterior and lateral radiographs A fault line may not be visible, but other radiographic findings may indicate a fracture. These include: Rear Front fat fat pads (Sail mark) Abnormal Abnormal front Humeruslinie radiocapitellare line A posterior fat pad on a true lateral radiograph of the elbow is always abnormal; This finding is specific to joint effusion, but not very sensitive. A versetzes anterior fat pad may display a joint effusion, but is not specific. However, if a posterior fat pad is seen, or if a large anterior fat pad (sail sign) is present, an occult fracture should be accepted and treated as such. The front upper arm line is a line along the front edge of the humerus on a real lateral radiograph. Normally, this line intersects the center of the capitulum (anterior upper arm line and radiocapitellare line.). If the line intersects no or only the front part of the capitulum, a rearwardly displaced distal humerus fracture is possible; Then oblique views are taken, and other imaging methods can be performed. The radiocapitellare line is a line through the mid-shaft of the radius on a real lateral radiograph of the elbow; usually it shares the Capitellum. If not, an occult fracture should be suspected. If findings in children are humerus fracture compatible with a distal, X-rays should be closely monitored for signs of occult fracture (z. B. a back fat, anomalies in the front upper arm or radiocapitellare line) are reviewed. Tips and risks When findings are humerus fracture compatible with a distal in children, check radiographs carefully for an occult fracture (z. B. a posterior fat pad, anomalies in the front upper arm or radiocapitellare line). A complete neurovascular examination is carried out when a fracture is suspected. Lateral radiographs of the elbow Image courtesy of Danielle Campagne, MD. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/elbow_with_anterior_fat_pad_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/elbow_with_anterior_fat_pad_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Lateral radiograph of the elbow ‘, description:’ u003Ca id = “v37898286 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDie front upper arm line and the line radiocapitellare are normal. However

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