Dacryostenosis

A dacryostenosis is nasolacrimal obstruction or stenosis of the common bile, which causes excess tearing.

A nasolacrimal obstruction may be congenital or acquired. One cause of congenital obstruction comprises the insufficient development of any part of the tear ducts. Typically persists nasolacrimalis a membrane at the distal end of the ductus. There are tearing and purulent discharge; this condition can manifest as chronic conjunctivitis, usually after the age of 2 weeks (mostly aged 3-12 weeks).

A dacryostenosis is nasolacrimal obstruction or stenosis of the common bile, which causes excess tearing. A nasolacrimal obstruction may be congenital or acquired. One cause of congenital obstruction comprises the insufficient development of any part of the tear ducts. Typically persists nasolacrimalis a membrane at the distal end of the ductus. There are tearing and purulent discharge; this condition can manifest as chronic conjunctivitis, usually after the age of 2 weeks (mostly aged 3-12 weeks). There are many causes of acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction. The cause is usually an age-related stenosis of the nasolacrimal duct. Other causes include an interruption of the nasolacrimal duct for a nose or face of a bone fracture and sinus surgery, inflammatory diseases (e.g., B. sarcoidosis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis [formerly Wegener’s granulomatosis]), tumor [z. B. maxilare and “ethmoid” sinus tumors] and dacryocystitis. Causes of Tränenpünktchen- or Kanalikulusstenose are a chronic (in particular herpes simplex) conjunctivitis, certain forms of chemotherapy, side effects of iodine-containing eye drops (particularly topical Ecothiophatiodid) and radiation. Causes of acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction Dakryolith (a calculus) granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener’s granulomatosis) Idiopathic (usually age-related) Sarcoidosis trauma (including operational nature, especially earlier sinus surgery) Tumor Diagnosis Clinical Investigation The diagnosis is usually based on clinical criteria. Sometimes explore and rinse the ophthalmologists Tränenwegsystem with saline, with or without fluorescein. Reflux indicates a stenosis. Manual therapy or surgical relief is displayed. Treatment of the underlying disease Congenital occlusion of the nasolacrimal duct opens often spontaneously around the age of 6-9 months. Before the first year of life the manual compression of the lacrimal sac may lead to the opening of the closure (4 to 5 times a day). After the first year of life of the nasolacrimal duct may need to be probed under general anesthesia. In recurrent closure a silastic milk tube can be inserted temporarily. With an acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction the underlying disease, if possible, treated. When a treatment is not possible or ineffective, can surgically a connection between the lacrimal sac and the nasal cavity to be created (dacryocystorhinostomy). In the case of Tränenpünktchen- or Kanalikulusstenose dilation usually leads to healing. In a distinct and disturbing Kanalikulusstenose surgery (conjunctive conjunctivo-Dacryocystorhinostomy or C-DCR) may be considered in which a Pyrexglasröhrchen, is inserted between Caruncle and nasal cavity (Operation Lester-Jones). Key points A dacryostenosis is either congenital or acquired. Symptoms include excessive tearing. Reflux of saline or fluorescein dye when the lacrimal drainage system confirm the diagnosis. With an innate dacryostenosis, the symptoms usually resolve within 9 months; a manual decompression of the lacrimal sac can help. In acquired nasolacrimal you treat the underlying disease. For congenital and acquired dacryostenosis, surgery may be required if symptoms persist.

Health Life Media Team

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