Creatine

In muscle creatine stored up for the ADP-forming phosphate ready, so that the ATP stores can replenish rapidly in anaerobic muscle contraction. Creatine is synthesized endogenously from arginine, glycine, and methionine in the liver; Food sources are milk, steaks and some fish.

(See also nutritional supplements Overview.) In muscle tissue stored creatine phosphate is prepared so that the ATP stores can replenish rapidly in anaerobic muscle contraction for the ADP formation. Creatine is synthesized endogenously from arginine, glycine, and methionine in the liver; Food sources are milk, steaks and some fish. Allegations creatine to improve the physical and athletic performance and eliminate muscle weakness. There is some evidence that it could improve the performance (eg. As of sprinters and weightlifters) in short-term peak load. Is demonstrated to be of therapeutic benefit in muscular phosphorylase deficiency (type V or glycogenosis McArdle syndrome) and gyrate atrophy of retina and choroid; first studies can also have an effect in Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis suspect. Numerous clinical studies have shown that creatine supplementation is well tolerated and may increase muscle mass. The effects can be seen in normal, healthy people, but also as a means to support the treatment of muscular diseases and to improve physical function and quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis (1-3). Side effects that can lead to weight gain creatine, may be due to the greater muscle mass; It can also cause false high creatinine serum levels. In (anecdotal) have been isolated cases of mild gastrointestinal events, dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and muscle spasms. No drug interactions are well documented. Notes on creatine Kley RA, Vorgerd M, Tarnopolsky MA. Creatine for Treating muscle disorders. Cochrane Database Syst Rev (1): CD004760, 2007. Branch JD. Effect of creatine supplementation on body composition and performance: a meta-analysis. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 13 (2): 198-226, 2003. Neves M Jr, Gualano B, Roschel H, et al. Beneficial effect of creatine supplementation in knee osteoarthritis. Med Sci Sports Exerc 43 (8): 1538-1543., 2011

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