Conversion Disorder

For conversion disorder include neurological symptoms or deficits that develop unconsciously and involuntarily, and include the usually motor and sensory functions. However, the manifestations do not match known pathophysiological mechanisms or anatomic conditions. Beginning, onset and maintenance of conversion symptoms i. Gen. attributed to psychological factors such as stress. The diagnosis is a history of exclusion causal physical illnesses. The treatment begins with building a trusting, supportive doctor-patient relationship; Psychotherapy can also be helpful as hypnosis.

A conversion disorder is a form of somatization-the expression of mental phenomena as physical (somatic) symptoms.

For conversion disorder include neurological symptoms or deficits that develop unconsciously and involuntarily, and include the usually motor and sensory functions. However, the manifestations do not match known pathophysiological mechanisms or anatomic conditions. Beginning, onset and maintenance of conversion symptoms i. Gen. attributed to psychological factors such as stress. The diagnosis is a history of exclusion causal physical illnesses. The treatment begins with building a trusting, supportive doctor-patient relationship; Psychotherapy can also be helpful as hypnosis. A conversion disorder is a form of somatization-the expression of mental phenomena as physical (somatic) symptoms. The conversion disorder develops tendency in late childhood or early adulthood, but can manifest itself at any age. It occurs more often in women. Symptoms and signs The symptoms of conversion disorder often develop suddenly, and the onset may often be associated with a stressful event. Typical symptoms include apparent shortcomings arbitrary motor or sensory functions, but sometimes include shaking movements and level of consciousness (points to seizures back) and abnormal positions of the extremities (suggesting a neurological or general physical condition). Patients may be, for. B. imagine with limitations of coordination or balance, weakness, paralysis of an arm or a leg, sensory deficits in a body part, convulsions, unresponsiveness, blindness, the double vision, numbness, loss of voice, difficulty swallowing, the feeling of a lump in to have neck, or urinary retention. Patients can only have a single episode or episodes may recur sporadically; the symptoms can become chronic. Typically, there are short episodes. Diagnosis Clinical Investigation The diagnosis of conversion disorder is to only consider after it was excluded by a complete medical examination and tests, a neurological or general medical illnesses that can explain the symptoms and their effects fully. An important feature is that the symptoms and complaints are not consistent with neurological disorders. For example, they are hardly an anatomical distributions follow (eg, sensory deficits, the parts of several nerve roots include.) Or results are possible in different tests vary or when evaluated in different ways, as in the following: A patient may have a pronounced weakness of plantar flexion have, when tested in bed, but can usually go on tiptoe. One patient in the supine position, the hand of the examiner felt under the heel of the “paralyzed” leg downward pressure when the patient’s unaffected leg against the resistance raises (Hoover’s sign). Tremor changes or disappears when the patient is distracted (z. B. by letting copy a rhythmic movement with his good hand the patient). Resistance to eye opening is detected during an apparent attack. A deficit in the visual field is tubular (tunnel vision). To comply with the criteria for a disorder, the symptoms must be so severe that they lead to a considerable burden or impairment in social, occupational, or other functionality. Treatment Sometimes hypnosis or behavioral therapy (CBT) A steady trusting and supportive doctor-patient relationship is essential. A gemeinschafltiche treatment involving a psychiatrist or psychosomatic and a doctor from another field (eg. As a neurologist, internist) appears to be extremely helpful. After the doctor has ruled out a general medical condition and assured the patient that the symptoms do not indicate a serious underlying disease, the patient may begin to feel better, and the symptoms may subside. The following treatments may help: Hypnosis can be helpful, by enabling the patient to control the effects of stress and their mental health on their bodily functions. (Editor’s note for the German space: Hypnosis is not admitted as a guideline procedures and is not financed by the payers.) Narkoanalyse is a rarely used method that is similar to hypnosis, in which the patient but a sedative is given to a state of to induce half asleep. (Editor’s note:. An unusual procedure in Germany) psychotherapy, including cognitive behavioral therapy works for some people. All comorbid mental disorders (eg., Depression) should be treated. More information Functional and Dissociative Neurological Symptoms: A Patient’s Guide

Health Life Media Team

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