Congenital Toxoplasmosis

Congenital toxoplasmosis is caused by transplacental transmission of Toxoplasma gondii. Findings, if any, are prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, hepatosplenomegaly, myocarditis, pneumonitis, rash, chorioretinitis, hydrocephalus, intracranial calcifications, microcephaly, and seizures. Diagnosis is serological or PCR. is treated with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and leucovorin.

Congenital toxoplasmosis is caused by transplacental transmission of Toxoplasma gondii. Findings, if any, are prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, hepatosplenomegaly, myocarditis, pneumonitis, rash, chorioretinitis, hydrocephalus, intracranial calcifications, microcephaly, and seizures. Diagnosis is serological or PCR. is treated with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and leucovorin.

(Toxoplasmosis.) Congenital Toxoplasmosis is caused by transplacental transmission of Toxoplasma gondii. Findings, if any, are prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, hepatosplenomegaly, myocarditis, pneumonitis, rash, chorioretinitis, hydrocephalus, intracranial calcifications, microcephaly, and seizures. Diagnosis is serological or PCR. is treated with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and leucovorin. Toxoplasma gondii, is a world-occurring parasite at 1 / 10000-80 / 10 min. 000 births causes congenital infection. Etiology Congenital Toxoplasmosis is almost exclusively due to a primary infection of the mother during pregnancy; but there are exceptions, including reinfection with a new serotype T. gondii or reactivation of toxoplasmosis in mothers with severe cell-mediated immune defects. Infection with T. gondii occurs after ingestion of improperly cooked meat containing tissue cysts or oocysts from food or water contaminated with cat feces. The rate of infection in the fetuses, the higher the later the women were infected during pregnancy. Nevertheless, the disease is more severe in early infected fetuses in general. All in all, about 30-40% of infected during pregnancy, women have a congenitally infected child. Symptoms and complaints Pregnant women who are infected with T. gondii, usually have no clinical findings, but some have a mild mononucleosis-like syndrome, regional lymphadenopathy or occasionally chorioretinitis. Likewise infected newborns at birth are generally asymptomatic, but symptoms can be as follows: prematurity Intrauterine growth jaundice hepatosplenomegaly myocarditis pneumonitis Various rashes The neurological manifestations such as chorioretinitis, hydrocephalus, intracranial calcifications, microcephaly, and seizures are at the forefront. The classic triad of findings from chorioretinitis, hydrocephalus and intracranial calcifications. Neurological and ophthalmologic effects can be delayed for years or decades. Diagnostics are Serial IgG measurement (for maternal infection) amniotic fluid PCR Serological (on fetal infection) tests, diagnostic imaging of the brain, cerebrospinal fluid examination, ophthalmologic evaluation Serological (for neonatal infection) and PCR tests of various body fluids or tissues tests in the diagnosis of maternal and congenital infection important. Maternal infection should be suspected if women mononucleosis-like syndrome, negative Epstein-Barr virus, HIV and cytomegalovirus have (antibody or PCR) test, in addition to isolated regional adenopathy exclusion of other causes (eg., HIV) or chorioretinitis. must be thought of a maternal infection in a seroconversion or a ?4-fold increase in titer between the acute infection compared to the recovery time. Maternal IgG antibodies can be detected throughout the first year of life the child but. PCR analysis of amniotic fluid is establishing itself as the method of choice for the diagnosis of fetal infection. There are numerous other serological tests, some of which can only be done in reference laboratories. The reliable methods are the Sabin-Feldman dye test, indirect immunofluorescence antibody assay (IFA) and the direct agglutination assay. Attempts to isolate the organism are inoculated into mice and tissue cultures, but these tests are not performed normally because they are expensive and not very sensitive. In addition, be weeks before significant results are there. If a congenital infection suspected, serological tests, magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography of the skull, CSF examination and a careful ophthalmologic examination should be performed. The cerebrospinal fluid may exhibit the following abnormalities: xanthochromia, pleocytosis and increased protein concentration. The examination of the placenta to a T. gondii infection can be helpful (eg. As placentitis). Non-specific laboratory results can be thrombocytopenia, lymphocytosis, Monocytosis, eosinophilia and elevated transaminases. PCR testing of body fluids with an investigation of cerebrospinal fluid and tissue (placenta) can also be performed to rule out infection. Congenital toxoplasmosis with permission of the publisher. From Demmler G .: Congenital and perinatal infections. In Atlas of Infectious Diseases: Pediatric Infectious Diseases. Edited by C. M. Wilfert. Philadelphia, Current Medicine, 1998. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/congenital_toxoplasmosis_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/ – / media / manual / professional / ? images / congenital_toxoplasmosis_high_de.jpg lang = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Congenital toxoplasmosis ‘, description:’ u003Ca id = “v37897788 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDiese CT image with scattered

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