Congenital And Perinatal Cytomegalovirus (Cmv)

A cytomegalovirus infection can be acquired before birth or perinatal and is the most common congenital viral infection. Findings at birth, if any, growth retardation, premature birth, microcephaly, jaundice, petechiae, hepatosplenomegaly, periventricular calcifications, chorioretinitis, pneumonitis, hepatitis and sensorineural hearing loss can be. When babies fall ill at a later date, pneumonia, hepatosplenomegaly, hepatitis, thrombocytopenia, sepsis-like syndrome and atypical lymphocytosis can be among the symptoms. A diagnosis of neonatal infection is best done by virus isolation on culture or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Treatment is mainly supportive. Parenteral ganciclovir or valganciclovir orally may prevent hearing degradation and bring about an improvement of development, and will be infants in whom in the neonatal period, symptomatic disease was found.

A cytomegalovirus infection can be acquired before birth or perinatal and is the most common congenital viral infection. Findings at birth, if any, growth retardation, premature birth, microcephaly, jaundice, petechiae, hepatosplenomegaly, periventricular calcifications, chorioretinitis, pneumonitis, hepatitis and sensorineural hearing loss can be. When babies fall ill at a later date, pneumonia, hepatosplenomegaly, hepatitis, thrombocytopenia, sepsis-like syndrome and atypical lymphocytosis can be among the symptoms. A diagnosis of neonatal infection is best done by virus isolation on culture or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Treatment is mainly supportive. Parenteral ganciclovir or valganciclovir orally may prevent hearing degradation and bring about an improvement of development, and will be infants in whom in the neonatal period, symptomatic disease was found.

(Cytomegalovirus (CMV).) A cytomegalovirus infection can be acquired before birth or perinatal and is the most common congenital viral infection. Findings at birth, if any, growth retardation, premature birth, microcephaly, jaundice, petechiae, hepatosplenomegaly, periventricular calcifications, chorioretinitis, pneumonitis, hepatitis and sensorineural hearing loss can be. When babies fall ill at a later date, pneumonia, hepatosplenomegaly, hepatitis, thrombocytopenia, sepsis-like syndrome and atypical lymphocytosis can be among the symptoms. A diagnosis of neonatal infection is best done by virus isolation on culture or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Treatment is mainly supportive. Parenteral ganciclovir or valganciclovir orally may prevent hearing degradation and bring about an improvement of development, and will be infants in whom in the neonatal period, symptomatic disease was found. The cytomegalovirus (CMV) is frequently isolated in newborns. Although most infants who excrete the virus are asymptomatic, other life-threatening courses and devastating long-term consequences may occur. It is not known which is the best conception time for a woman with primary CMV infection. Since the risk to the fetus is difficult to estimate, pregnant women who develop primary CMV infection should be advised. Many experts recommend routine serological examination of healthy women for CMV before or during pregnancy. The etiology congenital CMV infection, the incidence of which is 0.2-1% of live births worldwide can be transmitted transplacentally at a primary or reactivated infection of the mother. Clinically symptomatic newborns suffer most at a primary infection of the mother, particularly in the first half of pregnancy. In some upper socioeconomic groups in the United States is no evidence of any CMV antibodies in half of the young women, which increases the risk of primary infection. The perinatal CMV infection is acquired by contact with infected cervical secretions, breast milk or blood products. Maternal antibodies protect probable. Most newborns affected are asymptomatic and not infected. In contrast, premature babies who have no antibodies develop severe infections or die, especially when they get CMV-positive blood products. Efforts should be made to carry out a blood transfusion with CMV-negative blood or components in these children or to use blood that has been filtered to remove white blood cells, which may be CMV carrier. This leukozytenreduzierte blood is considered by many experts as CMV safely. Symptoms and discomfort many women who are infected with CMV during pregnancy, remain without symptoms, but some develop a mononucleosis-like image. About 10% of infants with congenital CMV infection are symptomatic at birth. Possible manifestations are: (Intrauterine growth retardation) prematurity microcephaly jaundice petechiae hepatosplenomegaly periventricular calcifications Chorioretinitis hepatitis pneumonitis hearing loss infants who are infected during or after birth with CMV, particularly when they are born prematurely, a sepsis-like syndrome can develop, even pneumonia hepatosplenomegaly, hepatitis (which can lead to liver failure), thrombocytopenia and atypical lymphocytosis. When the transfer is done, however, through breast milk, the risk of severe symptomatic disease and long-term effects is low. Diagnostic Viral culture using urine, saliva or tissue polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using urine, saliva, blood or tissue Symptomatic Congenital CMV infection must be of other congenital infections such as toxoplasmosis, rubella, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and syphilis be distinguished. In newborns, the most important diagnostic detection is a virus culture by PCR from urine, saliva or tissue. The diagnosis in the mothers may also be serologically or by PCR (diagnosis). The material should be kept refrigerated until inoculation on fibroblast cells. Congenital CMV infection occurs when the virus from urine, saliva or other body fluids that were obtained within the first 2-3 weeks of life can be isolated. Urine and saliva have the highest sensitivity. Positive cultures after this period of 3 weeks, can speak both congenital and for perinatal infection. Regardless of the route of infection children can stay for several years viral shedders. A complete blood count with differential analysis and liver function tests may be helpful in diagnosis. A sonography or computed tomography of the skull and an ophthalmologic evaluation should be made. Periventricular calcifications are usually found on a CT scan. Hearing tests should routinely performed in all infected newborns at birth and close monitoring will continue, because hearing loss after the newborn period to develop and can be progressive. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection with permission of the publisher. From Demmler G .: Congenital and perinatal infections. In Atlas of Infectious Diseases: Pediatric Infectious Diseases. Edited by C. M. Wilfert. Philadelphia, Current Medicine, 1998. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/congenital_cytomegalovirus_infection_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/ – / media / manual / professional / ? images / congenital_cytomegalovirus_infection_high_de.jpg lang = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Congenital cytomegalovirus infection ‘, description:’ u003Ca id = “v37897778 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eCT with multiple intracranial calcifications

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