Condylar Hyperplasia Of The Mandible

The condylar hyperplasia of the mandible is a disease of unknown etiology that is characterized by persistent or accelerated growth of the condyle on the normal growth phase addition. Without treatment, the growth finally stops.

A slow, progressive, unilateral enlargement of the coronoid process of the condyle and causes a cross bite, a facial asymmetry and a displacement of the center of the chin to the unaffected side. The patient may have a prognathisches appearance. The lower edge of the mandible is often convex on the affected side. Chondromata and osteochondroma (Benign bone tumors: osteochondroma) can have similar symptoms and signs cause, but they grow faster and may lead to an even stronger asymmetrical enlargement of the condyle.

The condylar hyperplasia of the mandible is a disease of unknown etiology that is characterized by persistent or accelerated growth of the condyle on the normal growth phase addition. Without treatment, the growth finally stops. A slow, progressive, unilateral enlargement of the coronoid process of the condyle and causes a cross bite, a facial asymmetry and a displacement of the center of the chin to the unaffected side. The patient may have a prognathisches appearance. The lower edge of the mandible is often convex on the affected side. Chondromata and osteochondroma (Benign bone tumors: osteochondroma) can have similar symptoms and signs cause, but they grow faster and may lead to an even stronger asymmetrical enlargement of the condyle. Diagnostic x-rays CT Usually on the radiographs, the TMJ look normal or increased in proportion condyle and the coronoid appear elongated. In general, a CT is performed to determine whether the increased bone growth generalized, confirming the diagnosis, or localized is limited to a part of the Kondyluskopfes. If growth occurs localized biopsy to differentiate between tumor and hyperplasia may be required. Therapy During active growth, usually condylectomy After completion of growth, orthodontic treatment followed by surgical repositioning of the lower jaw Treatment usually includes condylectomy during the phase of active growth. If the growth has stopped, orthodontic treatment and surgical repositioning of the lower jaw are indexed. If the height of the lower jaw body is greatly increased, the facial symmetry can be corrected by reducing the lower edge.

Health Life Media Team

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