Coenzyme Q10

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubiquinone), naturally produced by humans, is an antioxidant and is involved as a cofactor in mitochondrial ATP production. The levels of CoQ10 appear to be lower in the elderly and in people with chronic conditions such as heart problems, cancer, Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, HIV / AIDS and muscular dystrophy. However, it is not known whether these low values ??contribute to these diseases. Rich food sources include meat, fish and vegetable oils recommended Most studies show that the additional dose is in a range between 100 and 300 mg / day (eg., 100 mg three times daily).

(See also nutritional supplements Overview.) Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubiquinone), naturally produced by humans, is an antioxidant and is involved as a cofactor in mitochondrial ATP production. The levels of CoQ10 appear to be lower in the elderly and in people with chronic conditions such as heart problems, cancer, Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, HIV / AIDS and muscular dystrophy. However, it is not known whether these low values ??contribute to these diseases. Rich food sources include meat, fish and vegetable oils recommended Most studies show that the additional dose is in a range between 100 and 300 mg / day (eg., 100 mg three times daily). Allegations Because of its antioxidant effect and its role in energy metabolism applies CoQ10 as a useful supplement. As special effects coenzyme Q10 are said to have a antikanzerogener immunostimulatory effect, reduction in insulin requirements in diabetic patients, slower progression of Parkinson’s disease and efficacy in heart failure and protect against the cardiotoxic effects of anthracyclines. The most prominent claim may be improved endothelial cell dysfunction that contributes to cardiovascular disease. Although some preliminary studies suggest that CoQ10 may be useful in the treatment of these diseases, the results are unclear and further testing is required. Documents A meta-analysis of 2012, evaluated 5 randomized controlled trials with a total of 194 patients and found a significant improvement in endothelial function, as measured by flow-mediated dilation of peripheral arterial (1). A meta-analysis of 2,013 of randomized controlled trials suggests that coenzyme Q10 can improve the functional status in patients with heart failure (2). However, this meta-analysis consisted of studies involving mainly small size and short duration of treatment. A randomized, controlled, multicenter study conducted in 2014 of 420 patients with heart failure has shown that coenzyme Q10, 100 mg po given three times a day in addition to standard therapy, was sure the symptoms relieved and has reduced major cardiovascular events (3). In this meta-analysis, the doses and target blood levels of coenzyme Q10 were not standardized, which means a further limitation. Side effects There are relatively few case reports of gastrointestinal symptoms (loss of appetite, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting) and CNS symptoms before (z. B. dizziness, photophobia, irritability and headaches). Other side effects include itching, rash, fatigue and flu-like symptoms. Drug interactions CoQ10 may reduce the Warfarinwirkung. Information on coenzyme Q10 Gao L, Mao Q, Cao J, et al.Effects of coenzyme Q10 on vascular endothelial function in humans: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Atherosclerosis 221 (2): 311-316, 2012. Fotino AD, Thompson-Paul AM, Bazzano LA. Effect of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on heart failure: a meta-analysis. J Clin Nutr 97 am (2): 268-275, 2013. Mortensen SA Rosenfeldt F, Kumar A, et al. The effect of coenzyme Q10 on morbidity and mortality in chronic heart failure results from Q-SYMBIO: a randomized double-blind trial. JACC Heart Fail 2 (6): 641-649, 2014. doi: 10.1016 / j.jchf.2014.06.008

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