Chronic Venous Insufficiency And Post-Thrombotic Syndrome

Chronic venous insufficiency is an obstruction of the venous return, which sometimes results in discomfort in the lower limb edema and skin changes. The post-thrombotic (postphlebitische) syndrome is symptomatic chronic venous insufficiency. The reasons of chronic venous insufficiency are diseases that lead to venous hypertension, usually due to damage to the vein, or an insufficiency of the venous valves, as may occur after a TVT (for example). Diagnosis is based on history, physical examination and duplex sonography. The treatment consists of compression, wound care and rare surgical procedure. Prevention requires adequate treatment of DVT and compression stockings.

Chronic venous insufficiency has a frequency of up to 5% of people in the U.S. post-thrombotic syndrome can affect one-fifth to two-thirds of patients with DVT, usually within one to two years after an acute DVT.

Chronic venous insufficiency is an obstruction of the venous return, which sometimes results in discomfort in the lower limb edema and skin changes. The post-thrombotic (postphlebitische) syndrome is symptomatic chronic venous insufficiency. The reasons of chronic venous insufficiency are diseases that lead to venous hypertension, usually due to damage to the vein, or an insufficiency of the venous valves, as may occur after a TVT (for example). Diagnosis is based on history, physical examination and duplex sonography. The treatment consists of compression, wound care and rare surgical procedure. Prevention requires adequate treatment of DVT and compression stockings. Chronic venous insufficiency has a frequency of up to 5% of people in the U.S. post-thrombotic syndrome can affect one-fifth to two-thirds of patients with DVT, usually within one to two years after an acute DVT. The etiology of venous return in the lower extremities depends on the contraction of the lower leg muscles, the blood from intramuscular (soleus) sinusoids and the veins of the gastrocnemius muscle in and pumped out through the deep veins. The vein valves lead to a directed towards the heart bloodstream. Chronic venous insufficiency occurs when a venous laying (z. B. at DVT), an insufficiency of the venous valves or reduced contraction of the arranged around the veins muscles (z. B. due to immobilization) is present, the forward flow of the veins reduced and the pressure in the veins increases (venous hypertension). Fluid accumulation in the lower extremities (z. B. at right heart failure) can be obtained by triggering a venous hypertension also help. A long-lasting venous hypertension can lead to tissue edema, inflammation and hypoxia and corresponding symptoms. The pressure can be applied to superficial veins when the Perforatorvenen which connect the deep and superficial veins, are insufficient. The most common risk factor for chronic venous insufficiency Deep vein thrombosis Other risk factors include age Trauma Obesity Idiopathic cases are often attributed to a history with hidden DVT. The post-thrombotic (or postphlebitische) syndrome is a symptomatic chronic venous insufficiency, which follows a DVT. Risk factors for the post-thrombotic syndrome in patients with DVT include a proximal thrombosis, DVT repeated equilateral, and a Body Mass Index (BMI) ? 22 kg / m2. Age, female gender and estrogen therapy are also associated with the post-thrombotic syndrome, but probably nonspecific. The use of compression stockings reduced the risk of DVT. Symptoms and complaints The clinically evident chronic venous insufficiency may also cause no symptoms, but they always causes clinical signs; the post-thrombotic syndrome always cause symptoms. Both diseases are significant because its symptoms can mimic an acute DVT and both can lead to a significant limitation of physical activity and quality of life. The symptoms, swelling, heaviness, pain, cramping, fatigue and paresthesia in the legs get worse when standing or walking, and improve at rest or in Elevating the legs. Itching may accompany the skin lesions. The clinical signs occur along a continuum of: no changes, varicose veins (rarely) to the stasis in the lower legs and ankles, with or without ulceration (see Table Clinical Classification of chronic venous insufficiency). Compression of the lower legs may ache. Clinical classification of chronic venous insufficiency class clinical signs 0 No signs of venous diseases Ectatic 1 or reticular veins varicosis * 2 * 3 4 lesions by edema ve nous stasis (eg. B. pigmentation, induration, lipodermatosclerosis) 5 lesions by venous stasis ulceration and healed lesions 6 by venous stasis and active ulceration * Can idiopathic, without chronic venous insufficiency, occur. The venous stasis is composed of a red-brown hyperpigmentation, induration, venous ectasia, lipodermatosclerosis (fibrosing subcutaneous panniculitis) and stasis. Earlier venous Stauungsulkus © Springer Science + Business Media var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/16_stasis_ulcer_slide_7_springer_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/ – / media / manual / ? professional / images / 16_stasis_ulcer_slide_7_springer_high_de.jpg lang = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Earlier venous Stauungsulkus ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v38395884 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDie venous congestion includes lichenification and hyperpigmentation. A shallow ulcer develops over the medial malleolus u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e. ‘Credits’ © Springer Science + Business Media’

Health Life Media Team

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