Cellulitis

Cellulitis is an acute bacterial infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, usually by staphylococci or streptococci. Symptoms and signs include pain, a rapidly spreading erythema and edema, fever is possible, and the regional lymph nodes are often enlarged. The diagnosis is made because of the appearance. Cultures are sometimes helpful, but the wait for such results should not delay the empirical therapy. Treatment is with antibiotics. With early treatment, the prognosis is excellent.

Cellulitis is an acute bacterial infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, usually by staphylococci or streptococci. Symptoms and signs include pain, a rapidly spreading erythema and edema, fever is possible, and the regional lymph nodes are often enlarged. The diagnosis is made because of the appearance. Cultures are sometimes helpful, but the wait for such results should not delay the empirical therapy. Treatment is with antibiotics. With early treatment, the prognosis is excellent. Etiology Streptococcus pyogenes Staphylococcus aureus Cellulite is usually from ?-hemolytic group A streptococci (z. B. Streptococcus pyogenes), and Staphylococcus aureus causes. Streptococci cause diffuse, rapidly spreading infection because the pathogens produce enzymes (streptokinase, DNase, hyaluronidase) that degrade the cellular components that would otherwise mitigate the inflammation and limit focal. The staphylococcal cellulitis is typically circumscribed and in an open wound or abscess usually occurs. Streptococcal cellulitis with Accompanying tissue necrosis © Springer Science + Business Media var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/19_cellulitis_slide-2c_springer_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/ – /media/manual/professional/images/19_cellulitis_slide-2c_springer_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0 ‘, title:’ streptococcal cellulitis with Accompanying tissue necrosis’ description: ” credits’ © Springer Science + Business Media ‘, hideCredits : false, hideTitle: false, hideFigure: false, hideDescription: true}; var panel = $ (MManual.utils.getCurrentScript ()) Closest ( ‘image-element-panel.’). ko.applyBindings (model, panel.get (0)); Streptococcal cellulitis with Accompanying lymphangitis © Springer Science + Business Media var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/18_cellulitis_slide-2b_springer_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/ – /media/manual/professional/images/18_cellulitis_slide-2b_springer_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0 ‘, title:’ streptococcal cellulitis with Accompanying lymphangitis’ description: ” credits’ © Springer Science + Business Media ‘, hideCredits : false, hideTitle: false, hideFigure: false, hideDescription: true}; var panel = $ (MManual.utils.getCurrentScript ()) Closest ( ‘image-element-panel.’). ko.applyBindings (model, panel.get (0)); Streptococcal cellulitis © Springer Science + Business Media var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/17_cellulitis_slide-2a_springer_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/ – / media / ? manual / professional / images / 17_cellulitis_slide-2a_springer_high_de.jpg lang = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ streptococcal cellulitis’ description: ” credits’ © Springer Science + Business Media ‘, hideCredits: false, hideTitle: false , hideFigure: false, hideDescription: true}; var panel = $ (MManual.utils.getCurrentScript ()) Closest ( ‘image-element-panel.’). ko.applyBindings (model, panel.get (0)); Recently istMethicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) have become more frequent in the social environment (community-associated MRSA [CA MRSA]). Historically, MRSA was usually in patients who had the organism to exposure in a hospital or nursing facility is limited. MRSA infection should now be considered in patients with acquired in the social environment cellulite considered, especially in patients with recurrent cellulitis or who do not respond to monotherapy. Rarer causes are group B streptococci (e.g., BS agalactiae) in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus, gram negative bacteria (eg. B. Haemophilus influenzae) in children and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with diabetes mellitus or neutropenia, the visitors of hot or mineral sources and inpatients. Also, animal bites can cause cellulite. Pasteurella multocida is the cause of bite in cats and Capnocytophaga sp. is responsible for dog bites. Immersion injuries in fresh water can cause cellulite by Aeromonas hydrophila; vulnificus in warm salt water by Vibrio. Immunocompromised patients can be infected by opportunistic organisms, including gram negative bacteria (eg. As Proteus, Serratia, Enterobacter, Citrobacter or), anaerobic bacteria and Helicobacter and Fusarium spp. Mycobacteria can cause cellulite in rare cases. Risk factors include skin damage (eg. As injury, ulceration, fungal infection, other damage to the skin barrier by existing skin diseases) that are common in patients with chronic venous insufficiency or lymphedema. Scars from the removal of the saphenous vein in the context of cardiac and vascular interventions are often recurrent place phlegmonous inflammation of the skin, v. a. while tinea pedis. Often neither a predisposing disease can still be seen a portal of entry. Symptoms and complaints The infections usually occur in the legs. Cellulite is unilateral in general. Stasis dermatitis are very similar to cellulitis, but are bilateral in general. Main findings are a local erythema and tenderness, often with accompanying lymphangitis and regional lymphadenopathy. The skin is warm, reddened and edematous, often resembles the skin surface of an orange (peau d’orange). The demarcation is blurred usually, apart from erysipelas (a form of cellulitis with a sharp demarcation – erysipelas). Petechiae are common; large ekchymotische areas are rare. Vesicles and bullae may develop and rupture, occasionally with necrosis of the affected skin. Cellulitis may resemble the deep vein thrombosis, although there are often one or more distinguishing features (see Fig. Distinction between cellulitis and deep vein thrombosis). Fever, chills, tachycardia, headache, hypotension, and delirium may precede the skin findings by several hours, but many patients do not look sick. Leukocytosis is common. Cellulitis with rapid spread of infection, rapidly increasing pain, hypotension, delirium, or peeling skin, especially with blisters and fever, suggests a life-threatening infection. Cellulitis of the leg and foot © Springer Science + Business Media var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/25_cellulitis_slide_5_springer_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/ – / media /manual/professional/images/25_cellulitis_slide_5_springer_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0 ‘, title:’ cellulitis of the leg and foot ‘, description:’ u003Ca id = “v37894456 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDiese figure shows the focal redness and swelling

Health Life Media Team

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