Carcinoma Of The Paranasal Sinuses

(Sinus cancer)

Paranasal sinus (PNS) cancer is rare. Usually it is a squamous cell carcinoma, but can also be an adenocarcinoma, and occurs mostly in the antrum and ethmoid sinuses. In most cases the cause is unknown, the symptoms develop late and there is only a small chance of survival.

In the United States PNS is slightly broadened, but in Japan and among the Bantu people in South Africa. Men over 40 are most affected.

Paranasal sinus (PNS) cancer is rare. Usually it is a squamous cell carcinoma, but can also be an adenocarcinoma, and occurs mostly in the antrum and ethmoid sinuses. In most cases the cause is unknown, the symptoms develop late and there is only a small chance of survival. In the United States PNS is slightly broadened, but in Japan and among the Bantu people in South Africa. Men over 40 are most affected. The cause is unknown, but it is not believed that chronic sinusitis is the cause. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may play a role in some cases. Risk factors include Regular inhalation of certain types of wood, leather, and metal dust tobacco smoking symptoms and complaints because the sinuses make the cancer enough space available to grow, to develop symptoms normally until it is far advanced. Pain, nasal obstruction and discharge, epistaxis, diplopia, ear pain or fullness, facial paralysis and loose maxillary teeth below the affected sinus result from the local pressure of the cancer to the adjacent structures. The tumor is sometimes visible in the oral or nasal cavities. Diagnostic endoscopy with biopsy CT and MRI endoscopy, CT and MRI are widely used to locate the tumor and classify. Using biopsies can be determined which cell type. A classification, how far the tumor on the brain, face, neck, lungs and lymph nodes has spread helps in determining the therapy. Prognosis The earlier cancer is treated, the better the result. The prognosis also depends on histology. The survival rate is improving, but remains generally low. In general, about 40% of people have recurrent disease and the five-year survival rate is about 60% Therapy Surgical procedures often radiation Occasionally chemotherapy The treatment for most cancers at an early stage is a complete surgical removal. Recent advances in surgical techniques, particularly endoscopic techniques can sometimes achieve complete tumor excisions with recess of the surrounding tissue and reconstruction. If a high risk for recurrence, radiation therapy is used postoperatively. If surgical excision is not realistic or would cause significant morbidity, radiotherapy can be used in conjunction with chemotherapy. In some cases, chemotherapy is given to shrink the tumor; if the tumor responds well to chemotherapy, it is surgically removed. If not, the tumors can be treated with radiation.

Health Life Media Team

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