Candida Vaginitis

Candida vaginitis is infection of the vagina with Candida sp., Usually C. albicans.

The majority of the mushroom-induced vaginitis is caused by C. albicans (candidiasis (Mucocutaneous)) which is found in 15-20% of non-pregnant and 20-40% of pregnant women.

Candida vaginitis is infection of the vagina with Candida sp., Usually C. albicans. The majority of the mushroom-induced vaginitis is caused by C. albicans (candidiasis (Mucocutaneous)) which is found in 15-20% of non-pregnant and 20-40% of pregnant women. Risk factors for Candida vaginitis include the following: diabetes taking broad-spectrum antibiotics or corticosteroids pregnancy Close-fitting underwear immunodeficiency using an IUD Except for systemic hormone taking the candida vaginitis occurs rarely in women after menopause. Symptoms and complaints vaginal or vulvar itching, burning or skin irritation (which may increase during intercourse) and dyspareunia are common, which shows up as viscous, white, cottage cheese-like fluorine, clinging to the vaginal walls. Symptoms may take a week before menses. Redness, swelling and soreness of the skin are common symptoms. An infection of the male sexual partner is rare. Recurrence after treatment are rare. Diagnosis Vaginal pH and wet mount The pH in the vagina is <4.5; Hefesprossen, pseudohyphae or mycelia are visible in the native preparation, especially when using potassium hydroxide solution. A fungal culture is created when the symptoms to a candida vaginitis point, but appropriate complaints (including Vulvabeschwerden) are missing and no fungal components can be detected microscopically. In women with frequent relapses creating a culture is required to confirm the diagnosis and infection with another pathogen as Candida. exclude albicans. Hyphae and spores Candida vaginitis with permission of the publisher. From Sobel J.D. In Atlas of Infectious Diseases: Fungal Infections. Edited by G. L. Mandell and R.D. Diamond. Philadelphia, Current Medicine, 2000. From J.D. Sobel. In Atlas of Infectious Diseases. Edited by G. L. Mandell and M. F. Purely. Philadelphia, Current Medicine, 1996. var model = {thumbnailUrl: '/-/media/manual/professional/images/hyphae_and_spores_in_candidal_vaginitis_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350' imageUrl: '/ - / media / manual / professional / ? images / hyphae_and_spores_in_candidal_vaginitis_high_de.jpg lang = en & thn = 0 ', title:' hyphae and spores Candida vaginitis 'description:' u003Ca id = "v37897220 " class = ""anchor "" u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = ""para "" u003e u003cp u003eDas potassium hydroxide (KOH) wet smear shows hyphae and spores; 10% KOH destroyed epithelial cells

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