Caesarean Section

A Caesarean section is a surgical delivery by uterotomy.

Up to 30% of births in the United States carried out by caesarean section. varies the rate of caesarean sections. It has increased in recent times, partly because of concerns about an increased risk of uterine rupture in women who attempt a vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC).

A Caesarean section is a surgical delivery by uterotomy. Up to 30% of births in the United States carried out by caesarean section. varies the rate of caesarean sections. It has increased in recent times, partly because of concerns about an increased risk of uterine rupture in women who attempt a vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC). Indications Despite low morbidity and mortality rates of Caesarean section they are still several times higher than for vaginal delivery. Therefore, a caesarean section should only be performed when it is less dangerous for mother and baby than a vaginal birth. The most common specific indications for a cesarean are Former cesarean protracted parturition Fetal birth disorder (specifically a breech presentation) A pathological fetal heart rate, which requires rapid delivery Many pregnant women express a desire for an elective Caesarean section. The reasons are given to try to prevent damage to the pelvic floor (and subsequent incontinence) and serious fetal complications during birth. However, this approach is controversial, the data available is limited and requires a detailed discussion between the pregnant woman and her doctor. For a discussion of risks immediate and long-term family planning should include (z. B. specify the number of children). Many cesareans are performed in women with prior cesarean section, as a vaginal birth increases the risk of uterine rupture for them. However, the risk of uterine rupture during vaginal delivery is a total of only 1% (greater the risk for women who have had multiple Caesarean sections or longitudinal section uterotomy, in particular, if the thickened, muscular uterine content is concerned). A successful vaginal delivery, the experience about 60-80% of women with only one caesarean section in the medical history, which should be advised that previously had only one cesarean section with transverse incision in the lower uterine segment. The success of a vaginal birth after cesarean depends on the indication for the first cesarean section. A vaginal birth after cesarean should be performed in an institution where an obstetrician, an anesthesiologist and a surgical team immediately available; this makes a vaginal birth after cesarean impossible in some situations. Technical procedure during caesarean section should one keep ready in the neonatal resuscitation experienced specialist. The uterotomy can be performed classic or lower uterine segment. Classic: The incision is applied longitudinally on the rising uterus front wall to the upper uterine segment or the fundus. From this incision, a higher blood loss as usually is the result of a cut in the lower uterine segment, so it is usually applied only when a placenta previa or there is a child’s bank with lying to untem back, begins the birth before the deadline or if the lower uterine segment only is poorly developed or there is an abnormality in the fetus. Lower segment: sections in the lower segment are mostly carried out. A lower transverse incision is created in the corpus uteri thinned, stretched portion and the lower bubble envelope fold released from the uterus. A longitudinal incision in the lower segment is performed only at certain irregular settings and with extremely large children. In such cases, a transverse incision is not performed, because they are laterally in the area of ??Aa. could expand and cause excessive uterine blood loss so in some cases. Women with childbirth by lower uterine transverse incision should be informed about the safety of birth experiment in subsequent pregnancies.

Health Life Media Team

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