Cachexia In Cancer Patients

Cachexia is not primarily due to anorexia or decreased caloric intake. Rather, the cause of this complex metabolic action in an increased tissue catabolism. Protein synthesis is reduced and increases the degradation. The cachexia is promoted by various cytokines, v. a. Tumor necrosis factor ?, IL-1b and which are produced by tumor and host tissue cells in IL-6. In addition, the ATP-ubiquitin-protease metabolism plays a role.

Cachexia refers to the consumption of both adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. It occurs in many diseases and is widely used in many types of tumors, when a response or tumor control can not be achieved. Some tumor, v. a. Pancreatic and stomach tumors, lead to a pronounced cachexia. The affected patients can lose 10-20% of their body weight. Men usually suffer more from cachexia resulting from cancer than women. The degree of cachexia is dependent neither on the tumor size nor the spread of metastatic disease. Cachexia is associated with a reduced response to chemotherapy, physical weakness and increased mortality. Cachexia is not primarily due to anorexia or decreased caloric intake. Rather, the cause of this complex metabolic action in an increased tissue catabolism. Protein synthesis is reduced and increases the degradation. The cachexia is promoted by various cytokines, v. a. Tumor necrosis factor ?, IL-1b and which are produced by tumor and host tissue cells in IL-6. In addition, the ATP-ubiquitin-protease metabolism plays a role. Cachexia is easy to verify, primarily by the weight loss, which is most noticeable when there is a loss of muscle mass in the face. The loss of subcutaneous fat increases the risk of pressure ulcers on bony prominences. Treatment Treatment involves treating the tumor itself. If the tumor can be controlled or cured, then the cachexia improved regardless of the treatment modality. An additional high-calorie diet does not lead to regression of cachexia. Weight gain is usually only slightly and most likely due to the increase of fat tissue than muscle tissue, thereby improving neither the physical performance of the patients nor the prognosis. Therefore, a high-calorie diet is not generally recommended for most patients with a tumor disease and cachexia; an additional parenteral nutrition is not indicated, unless an oral feeding is not possible. However, other treatment approaches may reduce cachexia and the associated physical weakness. corticosteroids appetite and can help to make patients feel generally somewhat better, but they increase the body weight only slightly. Similarly, increase cannabinoids (marijuana, dronabinol) the appetite, but not the weight. Progestogens such. Megestrol acetate 40 mg p.o. 2 or 3 times a day, can lead to an increase in appetite and body weight. Means, which influence the production of cytokines, are currently being investigated.

Health Life Media Team

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