Blepharospasm

The blepharospasm (eyelid spasm) is a spasm of the muscles surrounding the eye, leading to involuntary blinking and eyelid closure.

The cause of blepharospasm usually remains unknown. Women are affected more often than men and it can be observed a familial aggregation. In rare cases, blepharospasm may occur secondary eye diseases; These include diseases which cause eye irritation (z. B. Trichiasis inwardly growing eyelash) corneal foreign bodies, keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eye) and systemic neurological diseases that cause spasms (z. B. Parkinson’s disease).

The blepharospasm (eyelid spasm) is a spasm of the muscles surrounding the eye, leading to involuntary blinking and eyelid closure. The cause of blepharospasm usually remains unknown. Women are affected more often than men and it can be observed a familial aggregation. In rare cases, blepharospasm may occur secondary eye diseases; These include diseases which cause eye irritation (z. B. Trichiasis inwardly growing eyelash) corneal foreign bodies, keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eye) and systemic neurological diseases that cause spasms (z. B. Parkinson’s disease). In severe cases, patients can not open their eyes. Symptoms include involuntary blinking and closing the eyes. The blepharospasm is intensified by fatigue, bright lights and anxiety. The treatment of blepharospasm is the injection of botulinum toxin type A in the ciliary muscles and must be repeated in most cases. Occasionally anxiolytics can be effective. A surgical cutting of the periorbital muscles is also effective, but should be taken into consideration only because of potential complications when the botulinum toxin therapy remains ineffective. Sunglasses reduce the light sensitivity that accompany a blepharospasm or can trigger.

Health Life Media Team

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