Black Cohosh

The black cohosh is the root of a plant that can be taken directly in powdered form, or as a tablet or solution. The preparation should be standardized to contain triterpenoids. The black cohosh does not contain phytoestrogens, which may be responsible for their well-known estrogen-like effect, but it contains small amounts of anti-inflammatory compounds, including salicylic acid.

(See also nutritional supplements Overview.) The black cohosh is the root of a plant that can be taken directly in powdered form, or as a tablet or solution. The preparation should be standardized to contain triterpenoids. The black cohosh does not contain phytoestrogens, which may be responsible for their well-known estrogen-like effect, but it contains small amounts of anti-inflammatory compounds, including salicylic acid. The allegations black cohosh is said that they for menopausal symptoms (eg. As hot flashes, mood swings, instability, tachycardia, vaginal dryness), is helpful for menstrual cramps and arthralgias in Reumathischer arthritis or osteoarthritis. Documents knowledge about the soothing effect on menstrual cramps are contradictory (1). There are few reliable data on their effectiveness in other disorders and symptoms. A recent review included 16 randomized controlled trials of women (n = 2027) using oral preparations of Cimicifuga racemosa (mean dose 40 mg). There was no significant difference between black cohosh and placebo in the incidence of hot flashes (3 trials, 393 women) in the menopausal symptom scores (four trials, 357 women) (1). A lack of standardization that is used between the studies of the supplementary product, indicates that further research is needed to provide definitive conclusions. Undesirable effects Adverse reactions are rare. The most common side effects are headache and gastrointestinal problems. Dizziness, sweating and hypotension (when high doses were taken) may occur. Theoretically, black cohosh in patients with aspirin-sensitivity, liver disease, hormone-sensitive tumors (eg. As certain types of breast cancer), contra-indicated stroke or high blood pressure. The US Pharmacopeia (USP) has, on a few case reports (2) recommended based that black cohosh preparations have to be provided with an indication that they are potentially hepatotoxic. Drug interactions There is little clinical evidence that black cohosh interfere effect simultaneously taken drugs. However, a recent in vitro study suggests that black cohosh, the biotransformation or efficacy of tamoxifen and irinotecan, both chemotherapy drugs inhibit (3). Information on Black Cohosh Leach MJ, Moore V. Black cohosh (Cimicifuga spp.) For menopausal symptoms. Cochrane Database Syst REV9: CD007244, 2012. Lim TY, Considine A, Quaglia A, et al. Subacute liver failure secondary to black cohosh leading to liver transplantation. BMJ Case Rep, Published online doi on 5 July 2013.: 10.1136 / BCR-2013-009325. Gorman GS, Coward L, Darby A, et al. Effects of herbal supplements on the bioactivation of chemotherapeutic agents. J Pharm Pharmacol 65 (7): 1014-1025,, 2013.

Health Life Media Team

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