Binge Eating Disorder

The binge eating disorder is characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating in which large amounts of food are consumed with a sense of loss of control. Then undue compensatory behaviors such as self-induced vomiting or Laxanzienmissbrauch follows. The diagnosis is made clinically. Treatment includes cognitive behavioral therapy or interpersonal psychotherapy sometimes.

From binge eating disorder about 3.5% of women and 2% of men are affected in the general population. In contrast to bulimia nervosa the binge eating disorder is most common in the group of overweight and obese people because they contribute to excessive caloric intake; it can consist 30% of patients who participate in weight-loss programs at ?. Compared to people with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa sufferers are older with a binge eating disorder, and men are also affected.

The binge eating disorder is characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating in which large amounts of food are consumed with a sense of loss of control. Then undue compensatory behaviors such as self-induced vomiting or Laxanzienmissbrauch follows. The diagnosis is made clinically. Treatment includes cognitive behavioral therapy or interpersonal psychotherapy sometimes. From binge eating disorder about 3.5% of women and 2% of men are affected in the general population. In contrast to bulimia nervosa the binge eating disorder is most common in the group of overweight and obese people because they contribute to excessive caloric intake; it can consist 30% of patients who participate in weight-loss programs at ?. Compared to people with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa sufferers are older with a binge eating disorder, and men are also affected. People with binge eating disorder are also desperate. Clinically manifest depression and preoccupation with figure, weight, or both, are more common in obese people with binge eating disorder than obese people who do not have this disorder. Diagnosis Clinical criteria Clinical criteria for the diagnosis require binge eating 1 times / week for at least 3 months and a sense of lack of control over eating, as well as the presence of ? 3 of the following: You eat a lot faster than normal You eat until a feeling uncomfortable saturation occurs eaten large quantities of food without being physically hungry You eat out of embarrassment alone after overeating raises a disgusted, depressed or guilty conscious feeling a binge eating disorder differs from bulimia nervosa (which includes binge eating includes) by the absence of the compensation behavior (eg. as self-induced vomiting, use of laxatives or diuretics, excessive exercise, fasting). Treatment Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) Sometimes interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) Consider drug therapy with SSRIs or drugs for weight loss. (Editor’s note: Sibutramine was taken off the market worldwide because of severe side effects.) CBT is the best researched and best-supported treatment. Both KVT than IPT also result in remission rates of ? 60%; the improvement can be sustained over the long term, as a rule. These treatments do not cause significant weight loss in obese patients. The conventional behavioral treatment for weight loss is short-term effect in reducing binge eating, but patients tend to relapse. Antidepressants also have a short-term efficacy in eliminating the binges, but the long-term effectiveness is unknown. Appetite-inflammatory drugs (eg. As topiramate) or medicines for weight loss (z. B. Orlistat) may additionally be helpful.

Health Life Media Team

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