Bejel, Pinta And Yaws

Bejel, pinta, and yaws (endemic treponematoses) are chronic tropical nichtvenerische spirochetal infections that are transmitted by body contact. Symptoms in Bejel are mucous membranes and cutaneous lesions, followed by bone – and Hautgummata. Yaws causes periostitis and dermal lesions. Pintaläsionen are limited to the skin. The diagnosis is made clinically and epidemiologically. Treatment is with penicillin.

The causative agent, Treponema pallidum subsp. endemicum (Bejel), T. pallidum subsp. pertenue (yaws) and T. carateum (pinta) are morphologically and serologically pallidum subsp from the causative agent of syphilis, T.. to distinguish pallidum. As with Syphilis (syphilis), the clinical course is characterized by initial mucocutaneous lesions, followed by secondary diffuse lesions, a latency phase and late destructive changes.

Bejel, pinta, and yaws (endemic treponematoses) are chronic tropical nichtvenerische spirochetal infections that are transmitted by body contact. Symptoms in Bejel are mucous membranes and cutaneous lesions, followed by bone – and Hautgummata. Yaws causes periostitis and dermal lesions. Pintaläsionen are limited to the skin. The diagnosis is made clinically and epidemiologically. Treatment is with penicillin. The causative agent, Treponema pallidum subsp. endemicum (Bejel), T. pallidum subsp. pertenue (yaws) and T. carateum (pinta) are morphologically and serologically pallidum subsp from the causative agent of syphilis, T.. to distinguish pallidum. As with Syphilis (syphilis), the clinical course is characterized by initial mucocutaneous lesions, followed by secondary diffuse lesions, a latency phase and late destructive changes. The pathogens are spread by close-sexual and non-sexual-skin contact, especially between children who live in poor hygienic conditions. Bejel (endemic syphilis) occurs mainly in arid countries of the Eastern Mediterranean, South West Asia and North Africa. The transfer comes through word-of-mouth contact or sharing of eating and drinking vessels. Yaws (Yaws) is the most common endemic treponematoses and occurs in humid equatorial countries where the transmission by scanty clothes and skin injuries is favored. Pinta, which is more limited in their geographical spread, occurs in the native inhabitants of Mexico, Central America and South America and is not easily transferable. The transfer is likely to require a contact with broken skin. Unlike T. pallidum other human Treponema subspecies are not transmitted via blood or the placenta. Symptoms and complaints Bejel begins in childhood with mucous patches (usually on the buccal mucosa) which can remain undetected, or as stomatitis in the lip angles. This painless lesions may subside spontaneously, but are usually followed by papulosquamous and erosive papular lesions of the body trunk and extremities, which are similar to those of yaws. Often a periostitis of the leg bones occurs. Later gummatöse lesions of the nose and soft palate develop. Yaws begins after an incubation period of several weeks at the inoculation site as a red papule that enlarges, which erodes and ulcerated (primary Yaws). The surface resembles a strawberry and the exudate is rich in spirochetes. The local lymph nodes may be enlarged and painful to touch. The lesion heals, but after months up to one year follow successively generalized eruptions resembling the primary lesion (secondary Yaws). These lesions often develop in moist areas of armpits, skin folds and mucous membranes. They heal slowly and may recur. keratotic lesions may develop on the palms and soles, the painful ulcerations cause (Krabbenframbösie). 5-10 years later destructive lesions (tertiary Yaws) can develop, these include periostitis (in particular the tibia), proliferative exostoses of the nasal portion of the maxillary bone (Goundou), juxta-articular nodes gummatöse skin lesions and ultimately mutilating facial ulcers, in particular region of the nose (Gangosa). Yaws-primary Upper illustration courtesy of Dr. Peter Perine on Public Health Image Library of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Lower illustration courtesy of K. McLennon, Tulane University Medical School, on Public Health Image Library of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/yaws_primary_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/yaws_primary_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Yaws-primary ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37896227 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003ePrimäre yaws manifests as large yellow papule or papillomas at the inoculation. The papules are highly contagious (above). This image shows the buttocks of a girl with primary yaws. Lesions in primary yaws can also form a crusted surface (bottom) u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e. ‘Credits’ Upper illustration courtesy of Dr. Peter Perine on Public Health Image Library of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Lower illustration courtesy of K. McLennon

Health Life Media Team

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