Bacterial Tracheitis

Bacterial tracheitis is a bacterial infection of the trachea.

Bacterial tracheitis is rare and can affect children of all ages. The most common pathogens are Staphylococcus aureus and ?-hemolytic streptococcus group A.

Bacterial tracheitis is a bacterial infection of the trachea. Bacterial tracheitis is rare and can affect children of all ages. The most common pathogens are Staphylococcus aureus and ?-hemolytic streptococcus group A. Most children have symptoms of viral respiratory infection for 1 to 3 days prior to the onset of the severe symptoms of wheezing and shortness of breath on. In some children, the onset is acute and characterized by a respiratory stridor, high fever and abundant purulent discharge. In rare cases, a bacterial tracheitis developed as a complication of a viral croup, or endotracheal intubation. the child may be very sick and breathlessness progressing quickly, so intubation is necessary as in patients with epiglottitis. Complications of bacterial tracheitis include hypotension, cardiac arrest, bronchopneumonia and sepsis. A subglottic stenosis due to prolonged intubation is unusual. Most children who have been treated adequately, do not develop sequelae. Diagnosis Clinical Investigation Direct laryngoscopy Characteristic radiological findings, the diagnosis of bacterial Trachetis is made clinically and confirmed by direct laryngoscopy, shows the purulent discharge and inflammation of the subglottic areas with a shaggy, purulent mucosa. In the lateral X-ray image of the neck you see a subglottic stenosis, which is irregular, unlike the regular, typical of the Krupp narrowing. A direct laryngoscopy should be performed under controlled conditions, so that an artificial respiration can take place quickly if necessary. Therapy airway antibiotics that are effective against S. aureus and Streptococcus species Treatment of bacterial tracheitis is the same in severe cases like the epiglottitis. If possible, endotracheal intubation should always be performed under controlled conditions and by experienced persons. The initial antibiotic therapy should cover S. aureus and Streptococcus species. Cefuroxime or equivalent iv Funds should be empirically appropriate when no prevail methicillin-resistant staphylococci in the area. In these cases, vancomycin should be used. The therapy in critically ill children should be accompanied by an experienced doctor who is familiar with the local conditions. If the triggering pathogen is known, the antibiotic therapy is changed accordingly and continued for ? 10 days.

Health Life Media Team

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