Autoerythrozytäre Purpura

(Gardner-Diamond syndrome)

The autoerythrozytäre purpura is a rare disease that affects only women. It is characterized by local pain and burning, painful bruising that occur mainly on the extremities, go ahead.

A autoerythrozytäre Purpura typically occurs in fair-skinned women who suffer from emotional stress or a concomitant psychiatric disorder. The recurring ecchymosis are painful and can spontaneously or after trauma or surgery occur. Bruising from trauma can occur at various points of the body. Coagulation tests provide unremarkable.

The autoerythrozytäre purpura is a rare disease that affects only women. It is characterized by local pain and burning, painful bruising that occur mainly on the extremities, go ahead. A autoerythrozytäre Purpura typically occurs in fair-skinned women who suffer from emotional stress or a concomitant psychiatric disorder. The recurring ecchymosis are painful and can spontaneously or after trauma or surgery occur. Bruising from trauma can occur at various points of the body. Coagulation tests provide unremarkable. In women suffering from autoerythrozytärn purpura, intradermal injection of 0.1 ml of autologous erythrocytes or Erythrozytenstroma to pain, swelling and induration at the injection site may lead. This indicates that the leakage of red blood cells is involved in the tissue in the pathogenesis of this disease. However, most patients also have severe, associated, psychiatric symptoms and some patients self-induced purpura, which can obscure the syndromes. Some clinicians suggest performing an intradermal injection of autologous red blood cells in one place and a separate control injection without erythrocytes at a different location to help you distinguish the disorder from a feigned illness. The occurrence of ecchymosis in 24 to 48 hours after injection at the test site, but not at the control point, indicates a car erythrocyte sensitization. An excoriation, which may complicate the interpretation of the test results is avoided by the injection sites are chosen so that they are difficult to reach for the patient. The test has not been validated and is not generally recommended. The treatment is psychiatric.

Health Life Media Team

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