Aspergillosis

Aspergillosis is an opportunistic infection, which is caused by inhaled spores of the fungus Aspergillus, which often occur in nature. The spores invade the blood vessels resulting in a hemorrhagic necrosis and infarction causes. The symptoms are similar to those for asthma, pneumonia, sinusitis or rapidly progressive systemic disease. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, but can be supported by the test material by imaging methods, histopathological findings and stain and culture. For the treatment of invasive aspergillosis is suitable voriconazole, amphotericin B (or its liposomal form), caspofungin or itraconazole. Mycotic “balls” in pulmonary caverns may also require surgical resection.

(See also the “Infectious Diseases Society of America Practice Guidelines for Diseases Caused by Aspergillus.”)

Aspergillosis is an opportunistic infection, which is caused by inhaled spores of the fungus Aspergillus, which often occur in nature. The spores invade the blood vessels resulting in a hemorrhagic necrosis and infarction causes. The symptoms are similar to those for asthma, pneumonia, sinusitis or rapidly progressive systemic disease. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, but can be supported by the test material by imaging methods, histopathological findings and stain and culture. For the treatment of invasive aspergillosis is suitable voriconazole, amphotericin B (or its liposomal form), caspofungin or itraconazole. Mycotic “balls” in pulmonary caverns may also require surgical resection. (See also the “Infectious Diseases Society of America Practice Guidelines for Diseases Caused by Aspergillus.”) Pathophysiology to an invasive infection occurs mostly by inhalation of spores, sometimes by direct invasion damaged skin. Major risk factors include neutropenia, when extended (typically> 7 days) Long-term high-dose corticosteroid therapy, organ transplantation (especially bone marrow transplantation graft-versus-host disease [GVHD]) Congenital disorders of neutrophil function (z. B. chronic granulomatous disease) Aspergillus sp tends body cavities such. B. Lungenkavitäten that of prior lung diseases (such. As bronchiectasis, tumors, tuberculosis) resulting, sinuses or the ear canal (Otomykose) to infect. These infections tend to run locally invasive and destructive, although it sometimes comes to a systemic spread, especially in immunocompromised patients. However, aspergillosis is unusual in patients with HIV infection. A. fumigatus is the most common cause of invasive pulmonary diseases; A. flavus usually caused invasive extrapulmonary disease, probably because these patients are more immunosuppressed than patients who are infected with A. fumigatus. Aspergilloma Image courtesy of M. Renz Public Health Image Library of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/aspergilloma_orig_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/aspergilloma_orig_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ aspergilloma ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v38396368 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eWahrscheinliches aspergilloma in the right upper lobe u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e ‘credits’. Image courtesy of M. Renz Public Health Image Library of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’

Health Life Media Team

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