Asbestosis

Asbestosis is caused by asbestos form of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. The diagnosis is based on history and Röntgenthorax- or CT findings. The treatment is symptomatic.

Asbestos is the generic term for naturally occurring fibrous silicates, which are well suited due to their heat resistance and structural properties as construction materials for buildings and ships, automotive brakes and some textiles. Chrysotile (a Serpentinfaser), crocidolite and amosite (amphibole or straight fibers) are the 3 main groups of disease-causing asbestos.

Asbestosis is caused by asbestos form of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. The diagnosis is based on history and Röntgenthorax- or CT findings. The treatment is symptomatic. Asbestos is the generic term for naturally occurring fibrous silicates, which are well suited due to their heat resistance and structural properties as construction materials for buildings and ships, automotive brakes and some textiles. Chrysotile (a Serpentinfaser), crocidolite and amosite (amphibole or straight fibers) are the 3 main groups of disease-causing asbestos. Asbestosis is a much more common result of exposure to asbestos as a cancer. Shipbuilders, workers in the textile industry, builders, home improvement, workers make the asbestos abatement, and miners exposed to asbestos fibers, are just some of the many vulnerable workers. Secondary exposure can occur in family members of asbestos-exposed workers and people living near mines. Pathophysiology alveolar macrophages that try to engulf the inhaled fibers, cytokines and growth factors Unlock, stimulate inflammation, oxidative damage, collagen deposition, and finally fibrosis. Asbestos fibers can also be directly toxic to lung tissue. The risk of disease is generally dependent on the duration and intensity of exposure and the type, length and thickness of the inhaled fibers. Symptoms and complaints Asbestosis is initially asymptomatic, but can progressive dyspnea, nonproductive cough and fatigue cause. The disease progresses in> 10% of patients even after the end of exposure. Advanced asbestosis can cause clubbed fingers, bilateral basal rales dry and in severe cases lead to symptoms of right heart failure (cor pulmonale). Diagnostic chest X-ray, preferably chest CT Sometimes bronchoalveolar lavage or lung biopsy The diagnosis is based on the exposure history and a chest x-ray or chest CT. In the X-ray image, a linear reticular drawing shows as a sign of fibrosis, normally in the peripheral lower lobe. Opacities are often bilateral and are often accompanied by pleural changes (asbestos-related pleural disease). Frosted glass opacity indicates a more advanced disease in which the middle and lower lung fields may be involved. determined as in the silicosis severity based on the “International Labor Organization” ( “International Classification of radio Graphs of Pneumoconioses”), based on size, shape, location and extent of the shadows. In contrast to silicosis the reticular pattern with asbestosis is predominantly localized in the lower lobe. Lymphadenopathy of hilar and mediastinal nodular and drawing are not typical and set other conditions close. The chest x-ray image is not sensitive, high-resolution (fine layer) thoracic CT is useful in cases of suspected asbestosis. CT is superior to chest x-ray also in the diagnosis of pleural. Lung function tests that show a reduced lung volume and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLco), are non-specific but at the follow-up of changes in lung function useful. Pulse oximetry is nonspecific performed at rest and during exercise, but well suited to detect an asbestos-induced impairment. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or a lung biopsy is indicated if non-invasive measures allow no conclusive diagnosis; the detection of asbestos fibers in patients with pulmonary fibrosis an indication of asbestosis, although such fibers can also occur in exposed persons without disease occasionally and can not be present in samples from patients Asbetose. Thus, the detection of asbestos fibers may be for diagnosing helpful but not necessary. Asbestos Body Image courtesy of David W. Cugell, M.D. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/asbestos_body_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/asbestos_body_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ asbestos body ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37893139 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eIntaktes asbestos particles in a lung sample u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e. ‘credits’ image courtesy of David W. Cugell

Health Life Media Team

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