Arteriovenous Fistulas

An arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and a vein.

An arteriovenous fistula can be congenital (usually smaller vessels on) or (z. B. through a wound by a ball or a stick) arise as a result of trauma or as a result of erosion of an arterial aneurysm into an adjacent vein.

An arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and a vein. An arteriovenous fistula can be congenital (usually smaller vessels on) or (z. B. through a wound by a ball or a stick) arise as a result of trauma or as a result of erosion of an arterial aneurysm into an adjacent vein. The fistula may cause the following symptoms and signs Arterial insufficiency (z. B. ulcers due to reduced arterial flow or ischemia) Chronic venous insufficiency through the arterial high pressure flow in the affected vein (z. B. peripheral edema, varicose veins, stasis dermatitis). Embolism (z. B. ulcerations cause) can from the venous pass into the arterial circulation, although pressure differences make this unlikely. If the fistula near the skin surface, a mass may be palpable and the affected area is usually swollen and hot when stretched, often pulsating superficial veins. A thrill may be palpable through the fistula and a continuous loud, machine-like back-and-forth sound with an emphasis during systole can be heard during auscultation. Rare, where a significant proportion of cardiac output is short-circuited through the fistula to the right heart, because of the high ejection can develop heart failure. Diagnosis Clinical Investigation Occasionally sonography fistulae are clinically diagnosed based on the presence of thrill, sounds and other signs. Doppler sonography is the best confirmation test. Sometimes therapy percutaneous closure techniques Occasionally surgery Congenital fistulas do not require treatment unless it develop significant complications (eg. As a leg lengthening the growing child). If necessary, percutaneous catheter techniques can be used to move the coil (coils) or plugs (plugs) in the vessels to occlude the fistula. The treatment is completely successful rare, but complications thereof are often controllable. Acquired fistulas usually have a large, single connection and can be effectively treated surgically.

Health Life Media Team

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