Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome (Aps)

(Antikardiolipinantikörper syndrome, lupus anticoagulant syndrome)

The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is an autoimmune disease in which patients have autoantibodies against phospholipid-bound proteins. Venous or arterial blood clots can occur. The pathophysiology is not well known. The diagnosis is made by blood tests. Anticoagulation is used to prevent and treat.

The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is an autoimmune disease in which patients have autoantibodies against phospholipid-bound proteins. Venous or arterial blood clots can occur. The pathophysiology is not well known. The diagnosis is made by blood tests. Anticoagulation is used to prevent and treat.

(See also Thrombotic diseases at a glance.) The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is an autoimmune disease in which patients have autoantibodies against phospholipid-bound proteins. Venous or arterial blood clots can occur. The pathophysiology is not well known. The diagnosis is made by blood tests. Anticoagulation is used to prevent and treat. The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder consisting of thrombosis and miscarriage (pregnancy) and is caused by various autoantibodies that are directed against one or more phospholipid-bound proteins (eg. As beta-2-glycoprotein I, prothrombin, Annexin A5). Annexin A5 can normally bind to components of the phospholipid membranes in order to protect them thereby against an excessive activation of blood coagulation. The autoantibodies displace annexin A5 and thus lead to a procoagulant effect of endothelial arterial and venous thromboses can cause. The mechanism of thrombosis in patients with autoantibodies to phospholipid-bound beta-2-glycoprotein I (apolipoprotein H, a type of cardiolipin) or prothrombin is unknown. Paradoxically, the results of coagulation tests can be extended because the autoantibodies to phospholipid-binding proteins interfere with the necessary investigations clotting factors and phospholipid. The lupus anticoagulant is an antibody that binds to the phospholipidgebundenen protein complexes. Although it was first discovered in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), these patients only the minority now account for those for which these autoantibodies is described. Other symptoms of venous or arterial thrombosis can also develop. Patients with antibodies to phospholipid-bound prothrombin may have circulating prothrombin level, low enough to increase the risk of bleeding. Diagnostic laboratory tests, starting with PTT PTT tests are performed in patients who are likely to undergo an invasive procedure or in those with unexplained bleeding or clotting. The presence of lupus anticoagulant can be accepted if an extended PTT is present, which do not immediately by the addition of normal plasma in the ratio 1: Correct 1, but only normalize by the addition of large amounts of phospholipids can (the test is carried out in a clinical pathology laboratory) , Antiphospholipid antibodies in the plasma are then determined directly by immunoassays in which bind IgG and IgM antibodies to phospholipid-beta2-glycoprotein I complexes in microtiter plates. Therapy anticoagulation for the prophylaxis and treatment of heparin, warfarin used (except in pregnant women) and acetylsalicylic acid. It is not yet known if the newer oral anticoagulants, either thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (z. B. rivaroxaban, apixaban) inhibit can be used for this disorder instead of heparin or warfarin.

Health Life Media Team

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