Angiography

Intravenous contrast medium is injected through a catheter into a blood vessel, which is connected to the vessel to be examined. Local anesthetics and sedatives may be used. If the catheter is inserted into an artery, the insertion site for 10-20 minutes must be continuously compressed after all instruments have been removed to reduce the risk of bleeding at the puncture site. Patients must also possibly lie flat for several hours or are observed in the hospital in order to reduce this risk.

Angiography is sometimes referred to as conventional angiography, to distinguish it from the CT angiography (CTA computed tomography (CT) CT angiography) to distinguish and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA using MRI magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)). Angiography provides detailed images of blood vessels, commonly those in the heart, lungs, brain and legs. Angiography can provide still images or moving images (Cineangiographie). Intravenous contrast medium is injected through a catheter into a blood vessel, which is connected to the vessel to be examined. Local anesthetics and sedatives may be used. If the catheter is inserted into an artery, the insertion site for 10-20 minutes must be continuously compressed after all instruments have been removed to reduce the risk of bleeding at the puncture site. Patients must also possibly lie flat for several hours or are observed in the hospital in order to reduce this risk. Angiography is, even if it is invasive, relatively safe. Using angiography CTA and MRA are often performed instead of conventional angiography. However, the conventional angiography is the traditional best examination method for assessing vascular lesions (eg. B. stenosis, obstruction, or other vascular arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, dissections, vasculitis). Common applications of the conventional angiography: Coronary angiography is performed usually before percutaneous or surgical interventions on the coronary arteries or heart valves. It is usually with cardiac catheterization performed (cardiac catheterization). The cerebral angiography can be used after a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA), z. As when stenting or carotid endarterectomy is contemplated. The iliac and femoral angiography is indicated before interventions that treat peripheral arterial disease. Aortography is sometimes performed to diagnose aortic aneurysms, aortic dissection and aortic regurgitation and provide anatomical information. Angiography of the eye arteries can be carried out by means of fluorescein dye. Conventional pulmonary angiography has long been the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism; Meanwhile, it has been largely replaced by CT pulmonary angiography [CTPA], which is less invasive. Conventional angiography is performed usually before therapeutic angiographic procedures such as angioplasty, vascular stents and embolization of tumors and vascular malformations. Variations angiography digital subtraction images of blood vessels are made before and after contrast injection; A computer then subtracts the image of before the administration of contrast medium with the image after contrast administration. Pictures of foreign structures are excluded, isolating images of blood vessel lumens that are clouded by contrast agents. Digital subtraction angiography imaging courtesy of Hakan Ilaslan, MD. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/dsa_left_vertebral_artery_stenosis_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/dsa_left_vertebral_artery_stenosis_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Digital subtraction angiography ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37898985 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDigitale subtraction angiography (DSA) of the left vertebral artery is a focus of the stenosis (arrow) u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e ‘credits’. Figure courtesy of Hakan Ilaslan

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