Angioedema

Angioedema as a swelling of the deep layers of the skin and subcutaneous tissue is designated. It is usually caused an acute mast cell-mediated response after exposure to medications, insect venom, food, pollen and animal dander. Angioedema may also be an acute response to ACE inhibitors, a chronic reaction or a congenital or acquired disorder be characterized by an abnormal Komplementantwort. The main symptom is swelling, which can be very strong. The diagnosis is made clinically. The treatment is performed as needed with an airway maintenance, elimination or avoidance of the allergen and medication to minimize the swelling (z. B. H1-blockers).

Angioedema include swelling (usually localized) of the subcutaneous tissue due to increased vascular permeability and extravasation of intravascular fluid. Known mediators of increased vascular permeability are:

Angioedema as a swelling of the deep layers of the skin and subcutaneous tissue is designated. It is usually caused an acute mast cell-mediated response after exposure to medications, insect venom, food, pollen and animal dander. Angioedema may also be an acute response to ACE inhibitors, a chronic reaction or a congenital or acquired disorder be characterized by an abnormal Komplementantwort. The main symptom is swelling, which can be very strong. The diagnosis is made clinically. The treatment is performed as needed with an airway maintenance, elimination or avoidance of the allergen and medication to minimize the swelling (z. B. H1-blockers). Angioedema include swelling (usually localized) of the subcutaneous tissue due to increased vascular permeability and extravasation of intravascular fluid. Known mediators of increased vascular permeability are developed from mast cells mediators (e.g., histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandins.) Bradykinin and developed from complement-derived mediators from mast cells mediators tend to attack the surface layers of the subcutaneous tissue including the dermal-epidermal junction. At this point, these mediators then cause urticaria and pruritus, which thus accompany a mast cell-mediated angioedema usually. When bradykinin-mediated angioedema the dermis is usually spared so that urticaria and pruritus missing. In some cases, the mechanism and the cause of angioedema is unknown. Some causes (eg. As calcium channel blockers, fibrinolytic drugs) do not have a clear mechanism. Sometimes a cause being overlooked clinically with a known mechanism (eg. B muscle relaxants). The angioedema can be acute or chronic (> 6 weeks). There are hereditary and acquired forms. Acute Angioedema Acute Angioedema is mast cell mediated in> 90% of cases. To dne mast cell-mediated mechanisms include acute allergic, typically IgE-mediated reactions. The IgE-mediated angioedema is usually from acute urticaria accompanied (wheals and local redness in the skin accompanied. Often, it is by the same allergens (eg. As medicines, insect venom, foods, extracted allergens) responsible for causing the acute IgE-mediated urticaria are responsible. the acute angioedema can also be a series of active substances which directly stimulate mast cells without the involvement of IgE causes can opiates, X-ray contrast agents, aspirin and NSAIDs. ACE inhibitors cause up to 30% of cases. with acute angioedema treated in the emergency room. ACE inhibitors bradykinin levels may increase directly. the most commonly affected are the face and the upper respiratory tract, but also the intestine. urticaria does not occur. angioedema may soon or years after arise commencement of treatment. Chronic angioedema The cause of chronic (> 6 weeks) angioedema is usually unknown. IgE-mediated mechanisms are rare, but a sustained uptake of unsuspected drug or chemical substances (eg. As penicillin in milk, a non-prescription drug, preservatives or other food additives) may be responsible for this reaction. In some cases it arises due to hereditary or acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency. The idiopathic angioedema is angioedema without urticaria. It is chronic and relapsing, and has no apparent cause. Hereditary and acquired angioedema The hereditary angioedema and acquired angioedema are diseases that are characterized by abnormal complement reactions and caused by a deficiency or dysfunction of the C1 inhibitor. The symptoms are those of bradykinin-mediated angioedema. Symptoms and complaints The angioedema are often asymmetrical and slightly painful. Often the face, lips and / or tongue are affected. Even the hands and feet or genitals can be affected. Edema in the region of the upper airways may cause difficulty in breathing and stridor, wherein the stridor can be misinterpreted as asthma; The airways can be completely closed. Edema in the intestines can cause nausea, vomiting, colicky abdominal pain and / or diarrhea. Angioedema of the tongue Science Photo Library var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/angioedema-on-tongue-science-photo-library-high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/angioedema-on-tongue-science-photo-library-high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0’, title: ‘angioedema of the tongue’, description: ‘ u003Ca id = “v37895571 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDie tongue is swollen in this patient with angioedema. u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e ‘credits’ Science Photo Library’

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