Air Pollution-Related Diseases

High air pollution can have a negative effect on lung function and trigger asthma and COPD exacerbations. Air pollution also increases the risk of acute cardiovascular events (eg. B. MI) and the development of coronary heart disease. Residents of areas with high traffic volumes are especially especially if the air at temperature inversion “is” at risk. All the so-called. Critical air pollutants (nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, ozone, carbon monoxide, lead, particulate matter) cause airway hyperresponsiveness, except carbon monoxide and lead. can be long-term exposure, the incidence of respiratory infections and symptoms in the general population, esp. in children, increase and decrease lung function in children.

The main air pollutants in industrial countries are NO2 (by combustion of fossil fuels), ozone (by the effect of sunlight on hydrocarbons and NO2), and solid or liquid particles suspended. Inside the house, as well as passive smoking is an additional source, such as the burning of biomass fuels (eg. As wood, animal waste, crops) in developing countries (eg. As for cooking and heating). High air pollution can have a negative effect on lung function and trigger asthma and COPD exacerbations. Air pollution also increases the risk of acute cardiovascular events (eg. B. MI) and the development of coronary heart disease. Residents of areas with high traffic volumes are especially especially if the air at temperature inversion “is” at risk. All the so-called. Critical air pollutants (nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, ozone, carbon monoxide, lead, particulate matter) cause airway hyperresponsiveness, except carbon monoxide and lead. can be long-term exposure, the incidence of respiratory infections and symptoms in the general population, esp. in children, increase and decrease lung function in children. Ozone, the main component of smog, acts on the airways very irritating and oxidizing. In the summer and in the late morning and early afternoon, the ozone levels are highest. Short exposures may cause dyspnea, chest pain and respiratory reactions. Children who are active at high ozone levels regularly outdoors, more likely to develop asthma long-term exposure to ozone results in a low-grade permanent reduction in lung function. Sulfur oxides produced by the combustion of fossil fuels with a high sulfur content can form readily soluble acidic aerosols, which can lead to deposits in the upper respiratory tract. Sulfur oxides can cause respiratory inflammation, which may increase the risk of chronic bronchitis and bronchoconstriction can be triggered. Air pollution with airborne particles is a complex mixture and is produced by the combustion of fossil fuels (esp. Diesel). The particles call both locally and systemically produce inflammation, which may explain their impact on both the lungs and the cardiovascular system. So-called PM2.5 (very small particles <2.5 microns) cause more inflammation per mass than larger particles. Data suggest that particulate matter, but especially cardiovascular and respiratory increase the death rate of all diseases. Surveys of air pollution have increased concerns about the possible health effects of even smaller particles, called nanoparticles, but clinical evidence of disorders associated with exposure to nanoparticles have yet to be reported.

Health Life Media Team

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