African Trypanosomiasis

(African sleeping sickness)

African sleeping disease is an infectious disease caused by infection with protozoa of the genus Trypanosoma and transmitted by the bite of the tsetse fly. This leads to symptoms such. B. characteristic skin lesions, intermittent fever, headache, rigors, transient edema, generalized lymphadenopathy and an often fatal meningoencephalitis. The diagnosis is sometimes provided by the detection of pathogens in blood or CSF Lymphknotenaspirat, by serological tests. Therapy is depending on the infecting subspecies and clinical stage with suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol, or eflornithine.

African trypanosomiasis is in West and Central Africa caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense in East Africa by, transmitted by tsetse flies. The pathogens are transmitted by tsetse flies and can be transmitted from a mother to her child prenatally. In rare cases, the infection is transmitted through blood transfusion; Theoretically it can be transmitted through organ transplants.

African sleeping disease is an infectious disease caused by infection with protozoa of the genus Trypanosoma and transmitted by the bite of the tsetse fly. This leads to symptoms such. B. characteristic skin lesions, intermittent fever, headache, rigors, transient edema, generalized lymphadenopathy and an often fatal meningoencephalitis. The diagnosis is sometimes provided by the detection of pathogens in blood or CSF Lymphknotenaspirat, by serological tests. Therapy is depending on the infecting subspecies and clinical stage with suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol, or eflornithine. African trypanosomiasis is in West and Central Africa caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense in East Africa by, transmitted by tsetse flies. The pathogens are transmitted by tsetse flies and can be transmitted from a mother to her child prenatally. In rare cases, the infection is transmitted through blood transfusion; Theoretically it can be transmitted through organ transplants. Pathophysiology Of the flies inoculated metacyclic trypomastigotes transform into blood trypomastigotes, multiply by binary division and spread after inoculation via the lymphatic vessels and bloodstream. Blood trypomastigotes proliferate until the number of parasites dramatically reduced by formed by the host organism specific antibodies. However, a part of the parasites escape destruction by the immune system by a change of the variable surface glycoprotein and starts a new cycle of propagation. The propagation and Lysezyklus repeats. Later in the infection, the trypanosomes appear in the interstitial fluid of many organs, including myocardium, and ultimately the CNS. The cycle continues when a tsetse fly bites an infected person or an infected animal. People are the most important reservoir of T. b. gambiense, but this kind can also occur in other animals. Wildlife are the main reservoir of T. b. rhodesiense. Life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Picture of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Image Library. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/trypanosoma_brucei_gambiense_life_cycle_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/trypanosoma_brucei_gambiense_life_cycle_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense ‘description:’. u003cdiv class = “list ” u003e u003cul data-mmanualobjecttype = “”list “” class = “”nobulleted “” u003e u003cli u003e u003Ca id = “”v1015867_de “” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003e1. During a blood meal on a mammalian host

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