Acute Otitis Media

Acute otitis media (bacterial or viral otitis media) on usually occurs as a side effect of a upper respiratory tract infection. Ear pain (otalgia) or often general symptoms (eg., Fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea) can be observed particularly in very young patients. The diagnosis is made otoscope. Treatment includes analgesics and sometimes with antibiotics.

Although acute otitis media (AOM) can occur at any age, are most often young children from 3 months to 3 years affected. At this age, the Eustachian tube is structurally and functionally not yet fully mature, because it is horizontal, and by the angle between the tensor veli palatine and the cartilaginous Eustachian her opening mechanism works less well.

Acute otitis media (bacterial or viral otitis media) on usually occurs as a side effect of a upper respiratory tract infection. Ear pain (otalgia) or often general symptoms (eg., Fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea) can be observed particularly in very young patients. The diagnosis is made otoscope. Treatment includes analgesics and sometimes with antibiotics. Although acute otitis media (AOM) can occur at any age, are most often young children from 3 months to 3 years affected. At this age, the Eustachian tube is structurally and functionally not yet fully mature, because it is horizontal, and by the angle between the tensor veli palatine and the cartilaginous Eustachian her opening mechanism works less well. Etiologically comes in acute otitis media, a viral or bacterial infection in question, using as a complication of viral infection often a secondary bacterial infection occurs. In newborns, acute otitis media is usually caused by gram-negative enterobacteria, especially Escherichia coli ,, and Staphylococcus aureus. In infants and children <14 years of age are Streptococcus pneumoniae ,, Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, and non-typable - Haemophilus influenzae; Types The most common pathogens and some rare ?-hemolytic group A streptococci and S. aureus. The> 14-year-olds predominate S. pneumoniae, ?-hemolytic group A streptococci and S. aureus, followed by H. influenzae. Risk Factors household smoking is a significant risk factor for acute otitis media. Other risk factors include a strong family history of otitis media, bottle feeding (i. E., Instead of breast feeding) and visiting a day care center. Complications of acute otitis media are rare. In rare cases, a bacterial ear infection can spread locally and lead to acute mastoiditis, Petrositis or labyrinthitis. Intracranial spread is extremely rare and usually causes meningitis, but occasionally a brain abscess, Subduralempyem, epidural abscess, a sinus thrombosis or a otitic hydrocephalus may develop. Intracranial complications are slow to heal, even under antibiotic therapy, especially in immunocompromised patients. Symptoms and complaints earaches are usually the first symptom often associated with hearing loss. Infants can also simply act cranky or have trouble sleeping. Small children often react with fever, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. In the otoscopic examination the eardrum may appear to bulge and flushed, with blurred landmarks and atypical position of the light reflex. In insufflation of air (pneumatic otoscopy) shows the eardrum immobile. After spontaneous eardrum bloody-serous or purulent discharge from the ear runs (otorrhoea). Acute otitis media illustration provided by Piet van Hasselt, M.D. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/acute_otitis_media_b_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/acute_otitis_media_b_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Acute otitis Media ‘, description:’ u003Ca id = “v37893955 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDas normal tympanic membrane (above) is pearl gray and has visible

Health Life Media Team

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