Acquired Renal Cysts

Acquired renal cysts are harmless cysts that must be distinguished from more serious cystic diseases.

(See also Overview of cystic Nierenerkrankheiten.)

Acquired renal cysts are harmless cysts that must be distinguished from more serious cystic diseases. (See also Overview of cystic Nierenerkrankheiten.) Acquired cysts are usually round with a thin wall and sharply limited. Lesions may be isolated or multiple. Solitary cysts renal cysts Insulated are often discovered by chance during imaging tests. but they must be distinguished from other cystic kidney changes and -raumforderungen such as renal cell carcinoma, which is typically irregular or multilocular with complex traits such as irregular walls, septa and places a blurred delineation for kidney tissue toward or has calcification. Its cause is unknown. They are clinically insignificant, as a rule, but can sometimes cause hematuria or become infected. Multiple cysts of the kidneys Multiple cysts are often found in patients with chronic kidney failure, particularly in hemodialysis for many years. The cause is unknown. but the cyst may have arisen as a result of compensatory hyperplasia of the residual functioning renal tissue. get more than 50 to 80% of patients on dialysis for> 10 years, develop an acquired cystic disease (acquired with multiple cysts). As usual criteria for the diagnosis ? 4 cysts in each kidney apply in sonography or CT. This disease can be distinguished as a rule by an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in that there is no family history and no small or normal-sized kidneys. Acquired cysts are usually asymptomatic, but occasionally patients develop hematuria, kidney or perirenal bleeding, infection or flank pain. Acquired cysts are primarily important because of the higher incidence of renal cell carcinoma. Whether the cysts can degenerate, is not known. For this reason, some doctors examine periodically patients with acquired cysts by sonography or CT to a renal carcinoma. In cysts that cause long term bleeding or infection, a percutaneous drainage or – rarely – be a full or partial nephrectomy required.

Health Life Media Team

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